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Is there a difference meaning of the two following sentences?

* So many people have never been unemployed as today.
* Never so many people have been unemployed as today.
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DaxiaoaixadIs there a difference meaning of the two following sentences?

* So many people have never been unemployed as today.
* Never so many people have been unemployed as today.

The first sentence is very awkward; the second sentence could be improved (Never have so many people been unemployed as today). I hope this helps. Happy Ides of March.
Do you mean if we put the adverb in the front of the sentence, we should reorder the sentence? I have here another example:

* Juan hardly remembers the accident that took his sister's life
!! Hardly remembers Juan the accident that took his sister's life
** Hardly Juan remembers the accident that took his sister's life.

are they all the same? Or only one of !! and ** is correct? What is the general rule for that, I mean if the "reorder" of sentences?
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The inverted sentences have already been discussed. Have a look here Inverted sentences, it might help you.

Your sentence should read "hardly does Juan remember etc...", but then I don't think natives would often begin a sentence with "hardly".

DaxiaoaixadDo you mean if we put the adverb in the front of the sentence, we should reorder the sentence? I have here another example:

* Juan hardly remembers the accident that took his sister's lifeSounds good.
!! Hardly remembers Juan the accident that took his sister's lifeHardly does Juan remember..
** Hardly Juan remembers the accident that took his sister's life.X

are they all the same? Or only one of !! and ** is correct? What is the general rule for that, I mean if the "reorder" of sentences?

Rule? I don't know. A more solid grammarian might answer that question. Perhaps we need an auxiliary verb to re-order sentences.
that thread helps a lot Emotion: wink There is a sentence in it:

No sooner did the bell ring than the children ran out of the school.

I don't understand the meaning of "No sooner". Can sombody explain it?

PieanneThe inverted sentences have already been discussed. Have a look here Inverted sentences, it might help you.

Your sentence should read "hardly does Juan remember etc...", but then I don't think natives would often begin a sentence with "hardly".
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Yes, it means: "the children ran out of the school as soon as the bell rang".
Daxiaoaixadthat thread helps a lot Emotion: wink There is a sentence in it:

No sooner did the bell ring than the children ran out of the school.

I don't understand the meaning of "No sooner". Can sombody explain it?


I don't know why there's a than in the sentence, maybe that might be confusing you.

The simple version = "The children ran out of the school the moment the bell rang."

No sooner basically means, the children couldn't have run out of the classroom any faster or sooner.
(EX) Never have so many people been unemployed as today.
(EX) Hardly does Juan remember the accident that took his sister's life.
These constructions are called "negative inversion".
The rule is: when a negative adverb (like "never") or a quasi-negative adverb (like "hardly") is put at the head of a sentence (for the purpose of emphasis), the positions of the subject and the finite verb are inverted almost obligatorily.

Why do they such things? I don't know the exact reason. But I once heard that it is because English people can feel most relaxed when hearing or reading sentences where the finite verb is at the second position (V2 constructions).

paco
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