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Hi there.

I've been told that there is not a plural word for "advice".
So, you shouldn't say, "I'll give you some advices" or something like that.

That the plural would be "pieces of advice".

Is that right?

I mean in formal speech /writing and in common informal speech also.

Thanks.
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Comments  (Page 3) 
AnonymousBack when we were in school, we've been taught to use "bits of advise" as plural form of advise. It's like "pieces of advise." Bits is plural like piece.

Thanks for your time,
Tigerlily
Hello Tigerlily,
Bits of advice, not advise.
Hey.. try to google "advices"...

Google (as a search engine) is not a trusted source of info...

Good luck.

P.s.: thanks for all for the examples and explanation
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Dear Sirs:

Sub: ADVICE VERSUS ADVICES

I am pasting below the meaning given to 'advice' in the online dictionary, 'thefreedictionary':

Information communicated; news. Often used in the plural: advices from an ambassador.

Email Removed">Email Removed
"Advice" is another type of noun. It's like bacon. No no no, not the food. The word. Try pluralizing that. Hard, right? And try pluralizing "water". Just as hard. Odd how when you don't think of doing it, you do it correctly. "Advice" is an uncountable noun, which is no trick sentence. You can't directly pluralize it. You can only pluralize it by using another pluralized noun. Like "He gave me words of advice".Example:-BaconCorrect: "There are three strips of bacon"Incorrect "I have three bacons"-WaterCorrect: "The 3 mL of Water tastes good"Incorrect: "Waters taste good"
In a business context, any advice/recommendation/suggestion from your boss or expert consultant is stronger than any advice/recommendation/suggestion from a peer or family member, unless your peer or family member signs a legal contract to provide you with permanent employment with a salary guaranteed to ensure above average living standard in relation to the government's consumer price index, and with stipulations on the amount of work being underwhelming.

In a personal context, any advice/recommendation/suggestion from your head of the household is stronger than any advice/recommendation/suggestion from a friend or coworker, unless your friend or coworker signs a contract to provide you with permanently luxurious housing and permanent supply of nutritious and delicious food.
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Advice can be singular (don't spit into the wind) or it can be plural as seen above.
Advice is a non-count, or mass, noun. It is always used in the same form, which just happens to look like the singular. There's no point trying to distinguish between singular and plural forms. That would be like trying to distinguish between "some sand" and "more sand." It's all uncountable. So why try to count it?
MountainHiker-

You are confusing non-countable with singular and plural.

The word "Advice", as used in your examples, is non-countable in grammar. We can never say "an advice" or "two advices" (at least, not in this context -- there is a different meaning of the word "advice" used in the financial industry that means the paper slip received as a receipt for certain transactions, and this is countable).

We can only say "advice" by itself, or "some advice" (or another similar quantifying expression). Examples: "Let me give you advice." OR "Let me give you some advice."

To illustrate further, take the example, "Let me give you some advice." The word "advice" could here be replaced by "sugar" or "water" -- two other common non-countable nouns in English grammar. "Let me give you some sugar." "Let me give you some water." Never "sugars" or "waters" -- both these nouns are in normal contexts non-countable. (Note: the word "sugar" can be countable in a chemistry-related or scientific context).

As noted in other responses, a possible way to grammatically count the advice you receive is using the expression "piece(s) of advice".
kayaker Hi there.
I've been told that there is not a plural word for "advice".
So, you shouldn't say, "I'll give you some advices" or something like that.
That the plural would be "pieces of advice".
Is that right?
I mean in formal speech /writing and in common informal speech also.
Thanks.

I have also this problem.

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