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my friend always uses "advise" instead of advice ... is that a proper way to use that word? For example... thank you for the advise on taking the train.

I know you can say -- please advise me on the best road to take. but isn't "advise" used incorrectly in the other example. what do you think?
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Hi,

You might find this Question on "Please be adviced" helpful.

"Advice" is the noun, "advise" the verb. When Matt advises people, he gives them advice.
advice is a noun with a C; advise is a verb with an S. C comes before S.
Noun starts with an N; verb starts with a V. N comes before V.

Noun --- advice
--------------------------------------
Verb --- advise

N comes before V.
C comes before S.

That should work. It took me years to tell them apart.
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Just don't try this with "affect" and "effect"!!!Emotion: smile
That is true. Thanks. Learn it from matthewq - http://www.wsu.edu/~brians/errors / lists common errors in English such as this.
Interesting thread.
Some time ago, I posted the rule for the endings "ise" and "ice"; the words in question then were "practise" and "practice". [url="http://www.EnglishForward.com/ShowPost.aspx?PostID=43262#43334 "]Here[/url] is the thread I'm referring to.
In response to my post, someone said that the form "practise" (for the verb) exists only in BrE, and that in AmE "practice" is the usual spelling of both the verb and the noun. I still find difficult to believe, but then you never know...
Does anyone have accurate information about this, please?

Thank you,

Miriam
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Just don't try this with "affect" and "effect"!!!


More additions:
Affect (verb)
Effect (noun)

PS: Effect has a verb form too but it carries another meaning.
Miriam,

Here is a direct quotation from the American Heritage Dictionary which I am physically holding and copying from at this very moment (Not easy - It weighs a ton!):

prac-tice [pronunciation given here] v. -ticed, -ticing, -tices. Also chiefly British prac-tise. [definitions for the verb follow] --n. Also prac-tise. [definitions for the noun follow]

There is no entry at all for practise in this dictionary.

Jim
So, as a closing then, either:

"Please advise." or "Advice, please."

would both be correct, but "Please advice." would not be... Am I correct?

Bill
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