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When I was talking with someone from the US about accents and dialects, I used the word, AAVE (African-American Vernacular English), he was not familiar with the word.
Is the word uncommon to use and hear in America?

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I've never heard or said this in Canada.

I assume you are thinking of this as an acronym, ie initials pronounced as a wrod.

eg NATO is an acronym, (we say NAY-TOE).

eg CIA is not an acronym.(we say (SEE-EYE-EH).


I wouldn't know how to pronounce AAVE as a word.

Clive

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moguwai007 I used the word, AAVE (African-American Vernacular English), he was not familiar with the word.

He is not a linguist, then. It is common among people who study dialects and speech patterns in the US, and perhaps sociologists. It is a subject in university studies. Educators may be familiar with the term. 'Ebonics" was used in California some time ago, but is now tinged with a derogatory meaning.

Here is a good article.

https://www.hawaii.edu/satocenter/langnet/definitions/aave.html

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moguwai007Is the abbreviation uncommon to use and hear in America?

No, but you're more likely to read "AAVE" and more likely to hear "Ebonics".


Synonyms: black talk, gangsta talk, nonstandard negro English

moguwai007Is the word uncommon to use and hear in America?

Yes. Only people who are interested in linguistics will have heard of it. The rest of us just talk like we talk and don't call it anything.

 Clive's reply was promoted to an answer.
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.

Thank you for your comment.

I often find black people in American movies talk like,
She be working all the time.
John ain't got no money.

And they sound like rap music.

I got interested and went down a Youtube rabit hole to figure that out.

And I found the language is called African-American Vernacular English aka AAVE.

And I found some videos about it.

So I thought it was common.

But now I understand that the term is known only to linguists, not to everyone.

Thank you very much.

Thank you for adding the synonyms.

moguwai007

Thank you for adding the synonyms.

Those "synonyms" are not recognized terms at all (I have never encountered them), and they are quite likely to give offense. Forget them. It's too bad that there isn't a neutral popular name for the dialect, but there isn't. Those who speak it don't need to call it anything, and the rest of us are mystified by it and write it off. The term "Ebonics" has attracted ridicule from the general public, taken as a euphemism for what is incorrectly perceived as nothing more than illiterate speech. I call it "African-American Vernacular English", and when people say "What's that?", I tell them.

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 AlpheccaStars's reply was promoted to an answer.
anonymousIt's too bad that there isn't a neutral popular name for the dialect, but there isn't.

That, to me, says more about the "dialect" than it does about the various names for it, most of which are fairly descriptive.

anonymousThe term "Ebonics" has attracted ridicule from the general public, taken as a euphemism for what is incorrectly perceived as nothing more than illiterate speech.

Or rather, the "dialect" itself has attracted ridicule from the general public because most people that don't speak it find it ridiculous (or are mystified by it, to use your euphemism). In fact, "Ebonics" is far more likely to offend whites ashamed of their own ethnocentrism than racially conscious blacks, who would likely prefer the term considering it was coined by a black scholar:

The word Ebonics was originally coined in 1973 by African American social psychologist Robert Williams[1] in a discussion with linguist Ernie Smith (as well as other language scholars and researchers) that took place in a conference on "Cognitive and Language Development of the Black Child", held in St. Louis, Missouri.[2][3] His intention was to give a name to the language of African Americans that acknowledged the linguistic consequence of the slave trade and avoided the negative connotations of other terms like "Nonstandard Negro English":


We need to define what we speak. We need to give a clear definition to our language...We know that ebony means black and that phonics refers to speech sounds or the science of sounds. Thus, we are really talking about the science of black speech sounds or language.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ebonics_(word )

anonymousI call it "African-American Vernacular English"

Bless your heart.

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