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I agree with the idea that we should change the system.

Is it possible to change it to:

I agree with changing the system.

without changing the original meaning?
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Hi Taka,

I agree with the idea that we should change the system.

Is it possible to change it to:

I agree with changing the system.

without changing the original meaning?


Here's a brief comment. When you speak of 'the idea of', it makes what you are saying sound a lot more theoretical, hypothetical. Without 'the idea of', it sounds more practical, perhaps more imminent.

Version #1 also explicitly says that 'we' should do the change. This is less obvious in version #2. Perhaps I agree that someone else should do the changing.

Best wishes, Clive
Does the expression 'I agree with changing the system' itself make sense? Does it sound OK?

And what about 'I agree with the change of the system'? Does it also sound OK?
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Yes, both are OK.

You may also consider:
'I agree with a/the change in the system'
  1. If you agree with changing the system, you either allow to change the system or agree to take the resposibility for changing it.

  2. If you agree with the idea of changing the system, you agree that something should be done yet unaware of how it should be done.

  3. If you agree with the change of the system, you agree with the form of the system which has been brought about by the changes.

  4. If you agree to change the system, you agree to manage all the necessary transformations.
My take,

Slava
It seems to me that one must agree with a person, not with an idea, nor with an action (changing).

I agree that we should change the system.
I agree with you that we should change the system.
I agree that the system should be changed.
I agree with Mr. Xenakis that the system should be changed.
I agree to change the system.

?I agree with a change to the system.
?I agree with changing the system.


These fall in the same category as:

?I disapprove of spinach.

CJ

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To agree with an opinion or idea is accepted usage, IMO.

See:
<agree to a plan> <agree with an opinion>
or even
<agree with classical antiquity [M. Hancu: i.e. with the ideas of classical antiquity]>
in:
---------
agree

intransitive verb

1 : to give assent : express approval : ACCEDE -- usually used with to or with and sometimes with in<agree to a plan> <agree with an opinion> <I agree ... in ... what you say -- Benjamin Jowett>

2 a : to achieve harmony (as of opinion, feeling, or purpose) : become of one mind <no two of his admirers would ... agree in their selection of characteristic passages -- Bliss Perry> <agree with classical antiquity in deeming a figure of speech to be worth frequent use -- C.E.Montague>


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To agree with an opinion is to agree with the person whose opinion it is.
Such a short cut rings true. I think this is an acceptable stretch of the main meaning of agree with.

So I suppose it would be
I agree with the opinion that ...

instead of
I agree that ...


the opinion and the that-clause are simply in an appositive relationship, so nothing to get excited about here, right?

In view of this, I should revise my view on idea as well. I suppose one could agree with the idea that ... for the same reason.

As for agree with classical antiquity, this requires a different reading of agree, a reading I was not even discussing above, nor was the original poster.

CJ
CalifJimIt seems to me that one must agree with a person, not with an idea, nor with an action (changing).

To agree with an opinion is to agree with the person whose opinion it is.
Such a short cut rings true. I think this is an acceptable stretch of the main meaning of agree with
Yes. That's what I thought. So I asked the question.

So Jim, you don't think 'agree with changing/a change' sounds natural?

What about you Clive? You didn't say it was awkward, did you?
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