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In some contexts, the spread of English marginalises the status of local and regional languages and potentially undermines or erodes local cultural values.

Do you agree with that statement?
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Hi milky,

I could not agree more. One day, the world could very well be monolingual.

Englishuser
EnglishuserHi milky,

I could not agree more. One day, the world could very well be monolingual.

Englishuser

You are probably right, should the human race last long enough. However, I think that it is debatable as to whether or not English would be the language.
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EnglishuserHi milky,

I could not agree more. One day, the world could very well be monolingual.

Englishuser

And we would all speak as if doing business presentations. Emotion: wink
<Do you agree with that statement?>

How can anyone disagree with a statement that begins "In some contexts" and contains "potentially"?

Yes, in some contexts, almost anything can (potentially) happen!

But isn't the history of language and the spread of languages riddled with such effects? Why regret what occurs naturally and inevitably? (It's rather like disapproving of death.)

CJ
English marginalises the status of local and regional languages and potentially undermines or erodes local cultural values"

You could say that the development of English did that to the inhabitants of Britain first Emotion: smile Seems a little unfair to pick on English. There are other languages which have been 'exported' too. Look at Spanish in the new world.

There's good and bad in everything. Look at Nigeria. English is one its 9 official languages, although it is not spoken by everybody, and those who speak it do so with a very wide range of abilities. However, a reasonably universal language has been to the benefit of a country with 521 total languages. Of those, 510 are living languages, 2 are second language without mother-tongue speakers (includes English), and 9 are extinct. So, the imposition of 9 official languages over and above most people's mother tongue/native language doesn't seem to have done too much harm if 510 are still living languages and only 9 have died out. And of course, we don't know from the statistics the reasons for those 9 to have died out. It may not be other-language related at all. This country literally has a situation where the people cannot communicate with most of the rest of the population using their native languages. With nearly 400 different tribes all attempting to live in one country a universal language is pretty much an essential.
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MilkyIn some contexts, the spread of English marginalises the status of local and regional languages and potentially undermines or erodes local cultural values.

Do you agree with that statement?

English doesn't spread because of the irresistible charm of phrasal verbs and Cockney rhyming slang. It spreads because it's the adjunct of certain political and economic changes.

MrP
<<Do you agree with that statement?>

How can anyone disagree with a statement that begins "In some contexts" and contains "potentially"?

Yes, in some contexts, almost anything can (potentially) happen!>

Great! Now, which contexts have you observed that happening in?

< Why regret what occurs naturally and inevitably?>

Each of your posts deny purposeful action. Hmm.
<However, a reasonably universal language has been to the benefit of a country with 521 total languages. Of those, 510 are living languages, 2 are second language without mother-tongue speakers (includes English), and 9 are extinct. So, the imposition of 9 official languages over and above most people's mother tongue/native language doesn't seem to have done too much harm if 510 are still living languages and only 9 have died out. >

I thought that the figure was around 400 languages spoken in Nigeria. And, did you know that, in Nigeria, English is seen as the language of "the last word"? If a policeman changes from the local language to English mid-discussion, his word is the last. No more to be said. Isn't that a kind of devaluation of local languages?

Also, please note that you omitted the modification placed in the original question.

<<In some contexts, the spread of English marginalises the status of local and regional languages and potentially undermines or erodes local cultural values.>>

<English marginalises the status of local and regional languages and potentially undermines or erodes local cultural values">
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