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Hi teachers!

Recently, I've heard this new word and I want to learn how to use it correctly. So, please check the grammar of these sentences.

1. She had a great time at the park, albeit rained.

2. She had a great time at the park, albeit it rained.

3. Albeit she was still sick, she went to school.

4. She went to school albeit she was still sick.

5. Mary doesn't speak Russian albeit she is Russian.

6. Albeit Tom was busy, he managed to attend the ceremony.

7. Tom managed to attend then ceremony albeit he was busy.

8. She would like to go to the beach but she didn't have time, albeit.


Thank you

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In American English, "albeit" seems outdated and somewhat snotty to me.

The Early Modern English period was also the time when albeit was at its most frequent. Soon after this, albeit rapidly diminished in frequency, but recently has had an increase in interest, as demonstrated by Google ngrams.

It is a shortened form of the subjunctive "although + be + it" . (And the subjunctive is going out of existence.)

I have never heard it in casual situations (conversations); and have seen it mostly in dusty old books or tomes.

Albeit is very rarely used as a conjunction for a full clause in modern usage examples.

The lecture was interesting, albeit too long.
The United States finally agreed, albeit unwillingly, to support the U.N. action.
It's certainly a handsome restaurant, albeit a bit loud once the crowd comes in.
The models predict that this pandemic will continue, albeit at a slower pace.
The French player of "le rugby" is a noble, free spirit, albeit prone to violence.

Comments  
MoonriseSo, please check the grammar of these sentences.

None uses the word correctly. Most would work with "although".

Moonrise1. She had a great time at the park, albeit rained.

Her day at the park was fun, albeit rainy.

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 AlpheccaStars's reply was promoted to an answer.
AlpheccaStars

In American English, "albeit" seems outdated and somewhat snotty to me.

The Early Modern English period was also the time when albeit was at its most frequent. Soon after this, albeit rapidly diminished in frequency, but recently has had an increase in interest, as demonstrated by Google ngrams.

It is a shortened form of the subjunctive "although + be + it" . (And the subjunctive is going out of existence.)

I have never heard it in casual situations (conversations); and have seen it mostly in dusty old books or tomes.

Albeit is very rarely used as a conjunction for a full clause in modern usage examples.

The lecture was interesting, albeit too long.
The United States finally agreed, albeit unwillingly, to support the U.N. action.
It's certainly a handsome restaurant, albeit a bit loud once the crowd comes in.
The models predict that this pandemic will continue, albeit at a slower pace.
The French player of "le rugby" is a noble, free spirit, albeit prone to violence.

Thank you so much for the valuable info you provided. I've never learned or heard it before. I've heard it recently on YouTube video ( those videos about English). I thought that it's belonged to advanced new words. So I was interested in knowing how to use it correctly.

anonymous
MoonriseSo, please check the grammar of these sentences.

None uses the word correctly. Most would work with "although".

Moonrise1. She had a great time at the park, albeit rained.

Her day at the park was fun, albeit rainy.

Yes, in fact, I was thinking in "Although" then I put "Albeit" instead to see whether it's used in the same way. If so, it will be easier for usage. But it seems that using "Although" is safest.

Thank you for your answer.

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