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Alice does not go to work on Saturday or Sunday.

Is it OK to use the following sentence?

Alice walks to work every day.

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PhotonIs it OK to use the following sentence?

Do you want the same meaning as "Alice does not go to work on Saturday or Sunday." ?

Your sentence is good English, but it has a different meaning than the quoted sentence above.

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Photon

Alice does not go to work on Saturday or Sunday.

Is it OK to use the following sentence?

Alice walks to work every day.

I would not. "Alice always walks to work."

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OK, of course. That's Present Simple tense.

 AlpheccaStars's reply was promoted to an answer.
AlpheccaStarsDo you want the same meaning as "Alice does not go to work on Saturday or Sunday." ?

No.

AlpheccaStarsthe quoted sentence above.

It' my original sentence.

Even if Alice does not go to work on Saturday or Sunday, is it OK to say "Alice walks to work every day" instead of "Alice walks to work every workday"?

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The best is:

Alice walks to work.

Thanks, AlpheccaStars.

I have something to add and it's just my opinion:

If the purpose of your focusing on"every day" was due to Alice doesn't go to work the whole week, then I understand that you meant:

"Alice goes to work every day except Saturday and Sunday." ( You could use it but it's unnecessary in my opinion because of the reason I'll write below)


1- First Case:

Alice has the SAME official weekend like others in her country.

In many countries Saturday and Sunday are considered an official weekend. And people in general are not expected to work on weekend even if they do so. I know that. So, in your case, look at your country's situation; if the weekend on your country was (Saturday and Sunday), then you could say: "Alice walks to work every day". (You don't need/have to specify that you she doesn't go on weekend in my opinion).


Because in the whole world, "weekend" is known, it's an international thing, and people supposedly are not expected to work on it, even if there are many people who work on them officially or even don't have off days.

Students could say :"We go to school every day" while in fact, they don't go on weekend because it's a formal vacation and no one would expect them to go to school on weekend. No one would think that they should have said " We go to school every day except Saturday and Sunday".

It would sound somewhat funny, because It's common sense; it's something unnecessary to specify it.


Regardless that there are students who could go to school on weekend under some circumstances, but that's another case, it's called "an exception", not a permanent situation. What I'm saying is generally speaking. In general, they don't go.


2-The Second Case:

Alice doesn't have the SAME official weekend like others in her country.

For example:

weekend in her country officially is Saturday and Sunday; she still works on them but she have off days on Monday and Tuesday. Here you could say: " Alice always walks to work"

Because in peoples' mind "Alice walks to work every day" means, she would even work on Monday and Tuesday because the official weekend by default is Saturday and Sunday. If you want to be accurate, and don't want them to be confused later when they realize that, you could say "Alice always walks to work" or to specify it by saying: " Alice goes to work every day except Monday and Tuesday"


In conclusion, in my opinion, if the off days happened to be the same as an an official weekend in your country, then you could say: "Alice walks to work every day" (without specifying)

If otherwise, you could say: " Alice always walks to work" or "Alice goes to work every day except A and B"

I changed "walks" to "goes" in the second sentence purposefully for some reason.

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Thank you very much for the detailed explanation.