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Hello,
I just came across the following sentence: "Coke viewing parties are taking place in cinemas all across Europe." Can we use "over" instead? I know it's a weird sentence, but there's a "League of Legends Competition" going on at the moment and the ones who are into it can watch the semi-finals there.

Thank you
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Comments  
Gene93Can we use "over" instead?
Yes, but that brings in some imagery for "all over" that the writer may have wanted to avoid.

You've spilled wine all over your shirt!
They've dumped their garbage all over my lawn!
The pressure cooker exploded and splattered carrots all over the kitchen wall!

CJ
By "over", I meant "all over", Jim. Not just "over". I am sorry for not being specific. Emotion: sad Are there any differences in meaning? I think they both mean "everywhere in Europe", "throughout Europe".
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The broad meaning is

all over - in all or many places in Europe

all across - from one side of Europe to the other side

The meaning is usually the same, as in your context.

Clive
Gene93By "over", I meant "all over", Jim. Not just "over".
Yes, I got that. That's not a problem.
Gene93Are there any differences in meaning?
Between what and what? "over" and "all over"? "over" and "across"?

CJ
Between "all over Europe" and "all across Europe".
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Gene93Between "all over Europe" and "all across Europe".
OK. In that case, Clive has already spared me the trouble of answering this one!

CJ
All across was used in the original, but I think it's wrong. I don't know. It's taking place in France and they have used "all across". That excludes Sweden, Denmark, etc. You can watch the finals in Sweden. That's why I think "all over" might be better. Emotion: smile
Gene93That excludes Sweden, Denmark, etc.
No, it doesn't. They are part of Europe.
Gene93All across was used in the original, but I think it's wrong.
You're being too picky.

CJ
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