re: All Along? page 2

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What does "all along" mean? What is the difference between "all along" and "always"? And in which case is it correct to use "all along"?
Thanks for your reply.
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Comments  (Page 2) 
Hi,

'We talked on the road all along when going there'

1.Do you mean 'all along' here sounds like we are talking about distance?It's not really clear to me what the writer means by the expression here. He should just say what he means in some other way.

2.'We talked all along on the road when going there.'
Does 'all along' here sound like we are talking about the time? Same comment as above.

3."We talked on the road the whole time/all this time/all the time when going there."
Are the positions of these expressions like 'the whole time' correct here? Yes.

Clive
Hi Clive,

Thanks again for your answer.

'He has always wanted to be a teacher.'

Can I use 'all the time' or 'all along' instead of 'always' here?

To me, 'always' seems to mean the same as 'all along' and 'all the time' here.

Thanks a lot.
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Hi,

'He has always wanted to be a teacher.'

Can I use 'all the time' or 'all along' instead of 'always' here?

To me, 'always' seems to mean the same as 'all along' and 'all the time' here.

No
'Always' is a general kind of word.

'All the time' and 'all along' suggest that we are speaking about some period of time in the person's life that we have some degree of familiarity with. eg we know what period 'the time' refers to.

So, if you say 'Tom has wanted to be a teacher all along', I might say 'Oh, you mean since he first entered High School?' In other words, I'll try to establish the period involved.

Clive
Hi Clive,

1. I see what you mean. So, We can't know exact period of time with 'always' here? It only means from a point of time in the past until now, but we don't know what the point of time refers to?

2.Do you mean 'all the time' doesn't work, either in 'He has wanted to be a teacher all the time'?

3."He wanted to be a teacher when he first entered High School. He has wanted to be one all along/all the time/since then."

Do 'all along' or 'all the time' or 'since then' all work here?

Thank you very much for your reply.
Hi,

1. I see what you mean. So, We can't know exact period of time with 'always' here? It only means from a point of time in the past until now, but we don't know what the point of time refers to? Always means . . . well, always. In a context like this, the listener understands 'for the person's whole life' is the basic idea.

2.Do you mean 'all the time' doesn't work, either in 'He has wanted to be a teacher all the time'? Yes, it doesn't work, for the reasons I explained. You could say 'When he was working in the warehouse, he wanted to be a teacher all the time'.

3."He wanted to be a teacher when he first entered High School. He has wanted to be one
all along /

all the time No. There needs to be a sense of duration of the period. 'When he first entered high school' is an event, not a period. You could say 'When he was in High School, he wanted to be a teacher all the time', because that's a period of time.

/since then."Fine

Best wishes, Clive
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Hi Clive,

Now I understand the use of 'all along'. However, I don't understand your explanation about 'always'. What does 'In a context like this, the listener understands 'for the person's whole life' is the basic idea' mean?

Doesn't 'always' mean from a point of time in the past until now' here?

Thank you very much for your reply.
Hi,
Let me try to illustrate what I was thinking.

The Earth has always gone around the Sun.

I have always had blue eyes.

I have always wanted to be a bus driver.

When the listener hears these sentences, he has to get some idea in his head of what 'always' means. Do you think it means the same in each of these examples?

Best wishes, Clive
Hi Clive,

I'm sorry I don't know if it means the same in each of those examples. Maybe you can tell me the answer.

Does 'always' emphasize the situation has never changed?

Thanks a lot.
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Hi,
I just meant that it's a relative term.
The Earth has always gone around the Sun. Millions of years.

I have always had blue eyes.My whole life. 30 years?

I have always wanted to be a bus driver. Since I first saw a bus. 20 years?

Yes, 'always' means that things have not changed during the period in question.

Clive
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