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1.You have the chance to volunteer, learn more about this fascinating country, and get to know the Mongolian people all at once.

2.Now you have the chance to volunteer, to learn more about this fascinating country, and to get to know the Mongolian people all at once.

3.Now you have the chance either to volunteer, learn more about this fascinating country, and get to know the Mongolian people all at once.

5.You have the chance either to volunteer, to learn more about this fascinating country, and to get to know the Mongolian people all at once.

Which sentences are acceptable in terms of grammar?
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Hi K.O,

The first two sentences grammatically make sense and I would add a comma or "--" after "people". The last two sentences are missing the coordinates linked by "or".
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Hi,

1.You have the chance to volunteer, learn more about this fascinating country, and get to know the Mongolian people, all at once. OK. I'd say all at the same time.

2.Now you have the chance to volunteer, to learn more about this fascinating country, and to get to know the Mongolian people all at once. OK. Same comment

3.Now you have the chance either to volunteer, learn more about this fascinating country, and get to know the Mongolian people all at once. 'Either' is wrong because you are speaking of 3 things.

5.You have the chance either to volunteer, to learn more about this fascinating country, and to get to know the Mongolian people all at once. Same comment.

Best wishes, Clive
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Comments  
Hi rishonly, 'either' when being used as a conjunction, can be applied to more than two elements in a series, like this:

Either the union will make a counteroffer or the owners will close the factory or the mayor will intervene.

She left her glove either at the convenience store, the library, or the playground.

But still, you're right about its improperness in my last two sentences.
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K.O.
Hi rishonly, 'either' when being used as a conjunction, can be applied to more than two elements in a series, like this:

Either the union will make a counteroffer or the owners will close the factory or the mayor will intervene.

She left her glove either at the convenience store, the library, or the playground.

But still, you're right about its improperness in my last two sentences.

Hi K.O,

I didn't mention anywhere that the correlative conjunction "either ..or" always takes only two elements.Emotion: smile, although it is most common that "either..or" takes two elements.
Yes you didn't. Think my post as a response given to the Clive's comment, then.