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Hello there,

What is the difference between "all else" and "everything else"

1. Other than those items approved by me, all else is prohibited.

2. Other than those items approved by me, everything else is probitied.
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Hi guys,

What is the difference between "all else" and "everything else"

1. Other than those items approved by me, all else is prohibited.

2. Other than those items approved by me, everything else is probitied.

Both of these are acceptable, although 'all else' sounds a little awkward to me here.

However, I'd like to focus on another point.

Since we already have the words 'other than', the word 'else ' seems redundant to me. I'd say this.

Other than those items approved by me, everything is prohibited.

You can see this more clearly if you rearrange the wording like this.

Everything is prohibited, other than those items approved by me.

All (students) are prohibited from using the library, other than those approved by the librarian.

Best wishes, Clive

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It seems to me that all else is in a more formal register, but that the meanings are the same.

Note a few expressions where all else tends to be used. Aside from these, everything else is more commonly used, I think.

all else being equal; when all else fails; above all else; before all else; to the exclusion of all else

CJ
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CogarHello there,

What is the difference between "all else" and "everything else"

1. Other than those items approved by me, all else is prohibited.

2. Other than those items approved by me, everything else is probitied.
To me, there isn't any difference.
 Clive's reply was promoted to an answer.
 CalifJim's reply was promoted to an answer.
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Hi CalifJim,

I saw your yin-yang symbol which reminded me that 'all' may be more than just 'everything' (i.e. all things).

But, of course, in daily speak, where we only recognize things, the two expressions are synonymous.

Ruud