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All of them were opposed to going on a picnic because of the rain.

All of them opposed to going on a picnic because of the rain.

Do both of the above sound right and mean pretty much the same? Thanks.
Comments  
>All of them opposed to going on a picnic because of the rain.

Bad English: not idiomatic.
Marius Hancu>All of them opposed to going on a picnic because of the rain.

Bad English: not idiomatic.
Thanks, Marius.

But why is the first in the following correct as opposed to the second which is seen as not idiomatic?

All of them objected to going on a picnic because of the rain.

All of them opposed to going on a picnic because of the rain.
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Angliholic
But why is the first in the following correct as opposed to the second which is seen as not idiomatic?

All of them objected to going on a picnic because of the rain.

All of them opposed to going on a picnic because of the rain.

Because there is no such thing as "oppose to doing something".

It is "oppose something".

As for "object", the pattern is "object to (doing) something". That is why it is correct. Each word has its own specific pattern. We just have to learn them.
To recapitulate:

1. All of them were opposed to going on a picnic because of the rain.

— This is fine. The idiom is "to be opposed to something".

2. All of them opposed to going on a picnic because of the rain.

— Not quite right; you can either use #1, or the idiom "to oppose something", as Lingua suggests, e.g.

3. All of them opposed the idea of going on a picnic.

Best wishes,

MrP

From what I could see, "were supposed to" is idiomatically used to convey the same thing as "opposed" which basically means "dislike or disapprove of soemthing". To confirm that, I did a short comparison on Google. Please correct me if I am wrong. I got the same meaning out of these postings in either "be +opposed" or "just "opposed"


First Feminists were Opposed to Abortion

First Feminists were Opposed to Abortion ... They argued that in order to eliminate the "evil" of abortion, we must reach the root cause -- society's ...
www.euthanasia.com/femin.html - 7k - Cached - Similar pages
New York State Coalition Opposed to Fluoridation (NYSCOF)
Who We Are The New York State Coalition Opposed to Fluoridation consists of physicians, dentists, legislators, lawyers, scientists, environmentalists and ...
www.orgsites.com/ny/nyscof/ - 44k - Cached - Similar pages
The PETA Files: Why We're Opposed to the EU Dog/Cat Fur Ban
Why We're Opposed to the EU Dog/Cat Fur Ban ... children next? what about people? would this type of wording be in place if it were people versus animals? ...
blog.peta.org/archives/2007/06/why_were_oppose_1.php - 40k - Cached - Similar pages
Sunday School Growth
People Who Are Opposed to the Gospel Are Not Opposed to Ice Cream .... Because we were meeting a basic human need. We were showing people real love and ...
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
People Opposed to the Proposed PGA Village
PLEASE: CALL YOUR CITY COUNCIL TODAY AND TELL THEM THAT THE PGA TOURS AGREEMENT SHOULD NOT BE VOTED ON UNTIL THE PEOPLE OF SAN ANTONIO HAVE A CHANCE TO KNOW ...
www.nopga.com/ - 13k - Cached - Similar pages

Materialist myths: Religious people opposed anesthesia in ...
Materialist myths: Religious people opposed anesthesia in childbirth. There couldn't be a better example of the warfare between religion and science than ...
www.overwhelmingevidence.com/oe/node/316 - 20k - Cached - Similar pages

Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Angliholic -- you could also say "All of them were opposed to going on a picnic."

Anonymous -- you said: From what I could see, "were supposed to" is idiomatically used to convey the same thing as "opposed" which basically means "dislike or disapprove of soemthing". If you meant "were opposed to" rather than "were supposed to", then you are mostly correct.

I would say there is a slight difference between saying (to use one of your examples) "They opposed anesthesia in childbirth" and "they are opposed to anesthesia in childbirth." The first one, using the verb, suggests more strongly that they actively did or said something against it. The second, using the adjective, describes their state of mind -- they don't approve of it, but they might never have tried to prevent it or prohibit it.

(In this particular example, I would bet that the people opposing anesthesia in childbirth are mostly, if not all, men!!)
Khoff
Angliholic -- you could also say "All of them were opposed to going on a picnic."

Anonymous -- you said: From what I could see, "were supposed to" is idiomatically used to convey the same thing as "opposed" which basically means "dislike or disapprove of soemthing". If you meant "were opposed to" rather than "were supposed to", then you are mostly correct.

I would say there is a slight difference between saying (to use one of your examples) "They opposed anesthesia in childbirth" and "they are opposed to anesthesia in childbirth." The first one, using the verb, suggests more strongly that they actively did or said something against it. The second, using the adjective, describes their state of mind -- they don't approve of it, but they might never have tried to prevent it or prohibit it.

(In this particular example, I would bet that the people opposing anesthesia in childbirth are mostly, if not all, men!!)

Thanks, my helpful friends.

Got it.