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Is it possible to use 'already' in negative sentences ? (especially in the Present Perfect tense) thx!
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Hi,

Is it possible to use 'already' in negative sentences ? (especially in the Present Perfect tense) thx!

Seems OK to me, although I had to think for a moment to find this example. The reason that I have not already cooked dinner is that the stove is not working.

Best wishes, Clive
And what about 'I don't already work in that company' ?
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"Still" is usually a better choice than "already" in negated sentences.
I think you might mean "yet." You are starting there, but you haven't started there yet. I don't yet work for that company.

Using "still" is a completely different meaning. You used to work there, but you don't work there anymore. I don't still work for that company.

You can use already, but it's not very common, at least in my experience. You can use it like this: Don't tell me you have eaten already! I planned to take you out to dinner. (Funny how both Clive and I thought of food examples.)

In the company example, that's present, not present perfect. Already is common with negative present. If you don't already have your books open to page 3, please do that now. If you don't already have your seatbelt on, please fasten it so we can get going.
Grammar GeekUsing "still" is a completely different meaning. You used to work there, but you don't work there anymore. I don't still work for that company.

I agree about yet but dont see the problem with still. I still haven't cooked the dinner. I haven't yet cooked the dinner.

What's the big difference?
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Is it possible to use 'already' in negative sentences ? (especially in the Present Perfect tense) thx!
As mentioned above, it is possible for a native speaker, after thinking it over, to construct such a sentence. However, it is not a regularly used pattern.

He has already arrived. He has arrived already.
He has not yet arrived. He has not arrived yet. He has still not arrived.
*He has not already arrived. *He has not arrived already.
*He has yet not arrived. *He has not still arrived. *He has still arrived.


The use of still not highlights the continuation up to the present of a state that began in the past.
The use of not yet gives the impression that a continuing state is expected to end when a future event occurs.

We have been waiting for a long time, and he has still not arrived. (Backward looking.)
He has not yet arrived, but we expect him to arrive soon.
(Forward looking.)

CJ
Bokeh
Grammar GeekUsing "still" is a completely different meaning. You used to work there, but you don't work there anymore. I don't still work for that company.

I agree about yet but dont see the problem with still. I still haven't cooked the dinner. I haven't yet cooked the dinner.

What's the big difference?
Ah, I see. I depends where you put the "still."

I still don't work there = I don't work there yet.

I don't still work there = I worked there in the past but no longer do.
I disagree with the "I don't still work there" = I worked there in the past but no longer do.
It should be I no longer work there, or I don't work there any more.
The difference in the cooking example is, as is often the case, an issue of intention.
I still haven't cooked dinner , - gives the idea that you should have done it by now. In this kind of situation the still shows that something was expected to happen and hasn't --- John was supposed to arrive at 9, it is 11 and he still isn't here yet. (You are really wondering what happened to hin!)
I haven't cooked dinner yet - gives the idea that you should have done it, but you are not very concerned about it. In this kind of situation something has taken longer, or is later than expected, but you feel it will happen soon.
John was supposed to arrive at 9, it is 9.10 and he isn't here yet. (You feel he is on his way).
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