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Hi,
could you tell me the difference between these sentences?
  1. Have you already seen this movie? It's Miami Vice...
  2. Have you seen this movie yet? It's Miami Vice...
I think #1 is equivalent to "Have you seen this movie at least another time in the past? or Have you ever seen it?", and #2 is more or less like "Do you still have to see this movie?"

In other words, it seems to me that #1 is a pretty general question, but if I use #2 it seems that the listener is somehow supposed to watch that movie, sooner or later.

Waiting for your advice, thank you in advance. Emotion: smile
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KooyeenHi,
could you tell me the difference between these sentences?

  1. Have you already seen this movie? It's Miami Vice...
  2. Have you seen this movie yet? It's Miami Vice...


  3. I think #1 is equivalent to "Have you seen this movie at least another time in the past? or Have you ever seen it?", and #2 is more or less like "Do you still have to see this movie?"

    In other words, it seems to me that #1 is a pretty general question, but if I use #2 it seems that the listener is somehow supposed to watch that movie, sooner or later.

    Waiting for your advice, thank you in advance. Emotion: smile

    Hello

    yet is used to talk about something that is expected.

    In questions it means we want to know if sg expected has happened.

    already = something happened earlier than expected.

    Compare:

    Have you already seen the movie? The questioner does not expect that you have seen the film until the present time.

    Have you seen the movie yet? The questioner expects a yes answer more than a no (yet is used to talk about something that is expected).

I heard that the difference is:

Already --> You are almost sure that it happened, you just want to check it out.

Yet --> You have no idea about what happened.

Best wishes Emotion: wink
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I'm sorry, I think I don't get it yet...
The problem is: "Already and yet in questions"

From a website: "We use yet in questions to ask whether something has happened up to the present time." But what confuses me is that I remember being told that using yet, we are also expecting something to happen in the future, sooner or later. Examples: "Have you finished yet?" (You are expected to finish, sooner or later) -- "Have you checked your mail yet?" (You are expected to check your mail) -- "Have you seen my new PC yet?" (You are expected to see my PC, sooner or later, I always show my friends the hi-tech things I buy)

So, to me, "Have you seen Miami Vice yet?", sounds like you are supposed to see that movie sooner or later, as if you were an enthusiast of movies...

And what's the meaning of "Have you already seen Miami Vice?" (or "Have you seen Miami Vice already?") Is it equivalent to "Have you seen Miami Vice at least once", or is there some kind of expectation here too?

Thank you
Hello everyone!Emotion: smile

I have problems with these two words too..

I have just finished watching a movie, one of the main character of the movie said something like..
-Are you famous yet?

What does it mean? From what I have read in the thread it means that you are going to be famous if not now in a future, but, thing is that the girl isn't very..bright. So, was that question made in an ironic way?

- Are you famous yet?
- Are you yet famous? It's wrong, isn't it?

- Are you famous already?
- Are you already famous?

What is the difference between these two sentences?
I am sorry I didn't understand much when I read the posts above..Emotion: sad
already situates our thoughts in the past.
yet situates our thoughts in the future.

Have you already seen this movie? -- because if you have already seen this movie, then I'm not going to bother to tell you what it's about, and I'm not going to recommend that you see it. In this question I am doubtful, but leaning toward thinking that you may have seen the movie.

Have you seen this movie yet? I have the feeling that you may be planning to see the movie. Maybe you told me earlier that one day you were going to see it. I want to know if you have finally carried out your intentions. If not, I may talk more about the movie, encouraging you to see it.

yet is much more common in a question, I would say.

CJ
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Thank you for your answer, CalifJim!Emotion: smile

I don't know if you have watched 'In her shoes', I took the sentence from there..

'Are you famous yet?' in this case it would mean that she had planned to be famous, and the person who asked the question wasn't being ironical?
Heh, you found an old thread of mine... an incomplete thread.
I left it as it was, and I've tryied to avoid "already" in questions. I thought "already" was used in questions when you were surprised, kind of. Like "Have you already finished? But you just started!"
So I left he thread incomplete, and thought the way to ask someone if they had seen the movie at least once was saying "Have you ever seen that movie" and not "Have you seen it already", unless I was surprised so I could say "Have you seen it already? But it hasn't been released yet!"
But now Jim replied and... does that mean I can say "Have you already seen that movie" even if I am not surprised, meaning more or less the same as "Have you seen that movie at least one time = Have you ever seen that movie"?
It seems so, reading Jim's post, but I'm still not sure... Emotion: smile
Yeah, as I said, I have problems with these two words, and knew it was once discused, so, I typed to two words and found this thread! Emotion: stick out tongue

I have another questinon..can you change the order of the words?

- Have you already seen that movie?
- Have you seen that movie already?

Would the change of place change the meaning of the sentence?Emotion: thinking
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