I can't stand when people use the made-up word "alright" and other words of that ilk such as using "all the way" in describing actionable directions.
For example:
"Do you feel alright?" (should be, IMHO, "Do you feel all right").

"Go all the way to the end." (should be, IMHO, "Go to the end.").

Is it just me?
Or do others feel "alright" and "all the way" are meaningless in this context?
Angela
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Angela formerly of Intel & Moto, Chandler, AZ wrote on 26 Jul 2004:
I can't stand when people use the made-up word "alright" and other words of that ilk such as using "all ... the end."). Is it just me? Or do others feel "alright" and "all the way" are meaningless in this context?

Some do and some don't.
"Alright" is, IMHO, an acceptable and idiomatic adverb in sentences like, "He said it, alright", in which "alright" means "that's for certain". But it's not formal written English in such cases.

From MW11:
"Main Entry: alright
Function: adverb or adjective
Date: 1887
ALL RIGHT
usage: The one-word spelling alright appeared some 75 years after all right itself had reappeared from a 400-year-long absence. Since the early 20th century some critics have insisted alright is wrong, but it has its defenders and its users. It is less frequent than all right but remains in common use especially in journalistic and business publications. It is quite common in fictional dialogue, and is used occasionally in other writing the first two years of medical school were alright — Gertrude Stein.
It is also, IMHO, an acceptable and idiomatic adjective in sentences like, "I'm alright, Jack", in which "alright" means "okay/fine/good". But it's not formal written English in such cases.

Franke: EFL teacher & medical editor.
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I can't stand when people use the made-up word "alright" and other words of that ilk such as using "all ... the end."). Is it just me? Or do others feel "alright" and "all the way" are meaningless in this context?

Do you really think that "alright" is meaningless in "Do you feel alright?" OK, you might not like the analogical spelling (cf. altogether, already, always, albeit), which I too would not recommend in formal writing, but does that make it meaningless?
And I doubt if even your own speech is always so colourless that you never use emphatic expressions like "all the way to the end".

By the way, some people can't stand the improper use of the expression "of that ilk".

Alan Crozier
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I can't stand when people use the made-up word "alright" and other words of that ilk such as using "all ... all right"). "Go all the way to the end." (should be, IMHO, "Go to the end."). Is it just me?

No. I much prefer 'all right'. I have no problem with the second one: it is idiomatic, I'd say.
Or do others feel "alright" and "all the way" are meaningless in this context?

Certainly not 'meaningless'; few English speakers wouldn't understand those sentences. Anyway, bad as it is, 'alright' is all right according to some experts, even. Perhaps because that is how what many, many people write, some of them never writing 'all right' at all, but some people, even right here in this august body, claim the two versions have slightly different meanings. I claim that degree of subtlety, in this case, isn't worth the trouble worrying over, but some will fight this question tooth and nail.

Charles Riggs
I can't stand when people use the made-up word "alright" and other words of that ilk such as using "all the way" in describing actionable directions.

Yes, it's like those clowns who use "altogether" instead of "all together".
For example: "Do you feel alright?" (should be, IMHO, "Do you feel all right"). "Go all the way to the end." (should be, IMHO, "Go to the end."). Is it just me?

Sadly not.
Or do others feel "alright" and "all the way" are meaningless in this context?

No, but I do think you should stop using "of that ilk" to mean "of the same kind".
Zen
I can't stand when people use the made-up word "alright" and other words of that ilk such as using "all ... all right"). "Go all the way to the end." (should be, IMHO, "Go to the end."). Is it just me?

Sadly not.
Or do others feel "alright" and "all the way" are meaningless in this context?

Meaningless?
Adrian
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I can't stand when people use the made-up word "alright" and other words of that ilk such as using "all ... the end."). Is it just me? Or do others feel "alright" and "all the way" are meaningless in this context?

Here are a couple of points in addition to what the others have written. 'Alright' is not a "made-up word" except in the sense that all words are made up. It has been in constant use since the late 19th century. When a present-day person uses it, he isn't going out of his way to be creative. He is using an established (albeit informal) construction.
I think we should go easy on 'alright' users. Compounds in al- go back many many years. Objections to them are fairly recent, and many got grandfathered in for even the most punctilious. It is unsurprising that some people have trouble memorizing which forms got in under the wire and which are stigmatized.
As for 'all the way', in some contexts it is for emphasis. Consider "The running back made it all the way to the endzone!" This would be pretty silly if he started from the opponent's one yard line, but it is reasonable if he started from his own one yard line. In other contexts it is indeed redundant. But that's natural language for you.

Richard R. Hershberger
From MW11: "Main Entry: alright Function: adverb or adjective Date: 1887 ALL RIGHT usage: The one-word spelling alright appeared some ... right but remains in common use especially in journalistic and business publications. It is quite common in fictional dialogue, and

I posted a question some months ago about the broader question, of which this is an example. Why would a writer, of fiction or non-fiction, misspell or spell something an unusual way in dialogue if it indicates the same pronunciation as the correct spelling?

Other common examples don't come to mind, but I mean things like writing alright, which is pronounced the same as all right. Or writing theze which would be pronounced the same as these. Writers seem to do this for poor or black characters even when there is no other indication that the character, or even a real person, can't spell correctly.
is used occasionally in other writing the first two years of medical school were alright — Gertrude Stein.

s/ meirman If you are emailing me please
say if you are posting the same response.
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meirman wrote on 27 Jul 2004:
From MW11: "Main Entry: alright Function: adverb or adjective Date: ... business publications. It is quite common in fictional dialogue, and

I posted a question some months ago about the broader question, of which this is an example. Why would a writer, of fiction or non-fiction, misspell or spell something an unusual way in dialogue if it indicates the same pronunciation as the correct spelling?

Perhaps an attempt to get away from formality and closer to phonetics. Dialogue is generally informal
Other common examples don't come to mind, but I mean things like writing alright, which is pronounced the same as ... black characters even when there is no other indication that the character, or even a real person, can't spell correctly.

What speakers sound like and what they spell like are unrelated. The visual impression of unusually spelt speech is enough to indicate that the character is speaking in dialect or with a decided accent.

Franke: EFL teacher & medical editor.
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