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Hi,
I know if I want to add a positive statement to another positive one, I can use "too", "also", "as well".
I know if I want to add a negative statement to another negative one, I can use "either".
But what if I want to add a negative statement to a positive one? Example:

-I heard you also have a PC in the living room.
-No, I have one in my room, but I (also?) don't (also?) have one in the living room (also?/too?).

My PC works very well now. I installed Flash Player 9 and updated the system. I (also?) don't (also?) need to use that bad-looking player anymore, I finally got the default one to open web radios.


...and so on. What do I have to do in similar cases? Thank you in advance Emotion: smile
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KooyeenHi,
I know if I want to add a positive statement to another positive one, I can use "too", "also", "as well".
I know if I want to add a negative statement to another negative one, I can use "either".
But what if I want to add a negative statement to a positive one? Example:

-I heard you also have a PC in the living room.
-No, I have one in my room, but I (also?) don't (also?) have one in the living room as well (also?/too?).

My PC works very well now. I installed Flash Player 9 and updated the system. Also, I (also?) don't (also?) need to use that bad-looking player any more, as I finally got the default one to open web radios.


...and so on. What do I have to do in similar cases? Thank you in advance Emotion: smile

Comments  
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also and either can only add to the same polarity already present. They can't contradict it. So neither also nor either makes sense. It seems to me that the simplest solution is to use but not, or on the other hand.

I have a PC in my room, but not in the living room.
Now that I've updated the system my PC works very well. So now I don't need to use that ugly player anymore because I finally got ...


I have a pet dog, but not a cat.
My father can do calculus, but not my mother.
Most of the students are confused by grammar. On the other hand, Kooyeen is not confused at all.


In reverse but or however (possibly with emphatic do) does the job:

I don't have a pet dog, but I do have a pet gecko.
My father can't do calculus; however, my mother can.
Oregon doesn't have sales tax, but California does.


CJ

Thank you very much,
I think I'd better avoid any weird structure... But do you mean that "also" is never used together with "not" or other negations (in negative sentences)?
For example, is it odd used this way?
I sing in the shower, in my car, when I'm drunk... but not also when I'm on the train!
Why are you so sure English is also spoken in Mexico? It is spoken in the US, in Canada, in Jamaica, (but) not also in Mexico!

It doesn't sound odd to me... Maybe my I'm confusing "not also" with "not only", which is different of course and I know how to use it, but maybe my brain is associating them in some way. Plus, consider that in Italian there is nothing wrong with structures like "not also", so my language might well be another reason for my confusion.

By the way, I found a mistake in your post...
CalifJimMost of the students are confused by grammar. On the other hand, Kooyeen is not confused at all.
... but not also when I'm on the train? ... but not also in Mexico?

but not also doesn't ring true to me as idiomatic English, but I suppose it's acceptable. Maybe I've been thinking too hard about it, and everything is starting to sound wrong!

I think I'd use a wordier expression. Emotion: smile

I sing ..., and ..., and ..., but I can't say that I sing when I'm on the train.
... spoken in ..., and in ..., and in ..., but it is not as widespread as Mexico.
____

Do you mean neanche? I would say not even for that, not not also.

-- Dov'e la basilica?
-- Mi dispiace. Non so neanche dove sono io.

-- Where's the basilica?
-- Sorry. I don't even know where
I am.

CJ
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