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Hi there teachers!

I know that changing the position/placement of words such as "too" and "also" might affect the meaning of a sentence. But I'm not too sure about what difference that makes.

For example:

A: I have seen that movie many times.

B: Well, I, too, have seen it a couple of times.

Bi: Well, I have seen it, too, a couple of times.

Bii: Well, I have seen it a couple of times, too.

Biii: Well, I have, too, seen it a couple of times.

Another situation with "too":

Ram: How have you spent time during the lockdown?

Sita: I've read a lot of books, planted some trees in my garden, and watched a lot of classic movies, too.

Sita1: I, too, have read a lot of books, planted some trees... .

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LaboriousB: Well, I, too, have seen it a couple of times.

"I, too" is stilted in conversation.

LaboriousBi: Well, I have seen it, too, a couple of times.

Natural. It means that you have seen it, as he has. You tack on "a couple of times" at the end to express that you have not seen it as many times as A has.

LaboriousBii: Well, I have seen it a couple of times, too.

Same as the last one, except in careful speech you would not say it that way because it implies that A has seen it a couple of times, but we know that he has seen it many times.

LaboriousBiii: Well, I have, too, seen it a couple of times.

Not natural.

LaboriousSita: I've read a lot of books, planted some trees in my garden, and watched a lot of classic movies, too.

The "too" implies that watching movies is in a separate category from the first two activities.

LaboriousSita1: I, too, have read a lot of books, planted some trees... .

"I, too" is stilted.

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Thanks a lot for your help, dear sir/ma'am!

anonymousLaboriousSita1: I, too, have read a lot of books, planted some trees... ."I, too" is stilted.

Would that be more appropriate in a conversation where person "Ram" says that he did the same or similar things to spend his time during the lockdown?

For example:

Ram to Sita: During the lockdown, I have spent time reading newspaper(s), having long chats with friends and relatives over the phone, and listening to music on my old radio.

Then Sita says (to tell him what she's done): Well, I, too, have spent time... .

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Also:

A: I'm going to NY today to meet your mom.

A's daughter:

1. I also would like to go with you.

2. Also, I'd like to go with you.

3. I'd like also to go with you.

4. I'd like to go also with you.

5. I'd like to go with you also.

Which one(s) of these do you think is/are acceptable, please?

LaboriousWould that be more appropriate in a conversation where person "Ram" says that he did the same or similar things to spend his time during the lockdown?

Well, it is good English, all right, but the "I, too" structure sounds mock formal in that context in my dialect in casual speech.

LaboriousWhich one(s) of these do you think is/are acceptable, please?

Only number 5 is even possible in my East Coast US dialect, and we would normally say "too" instead of "that" there if we didn't say the usual "I'd like to go with you." Both "too" and "also" sound redundant with "with" unless A had said something like, "I'm taking your brothers to New York to see your mom."