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This is my first post here at the forum. Looking forward for more and more.

Consider this sentence "A boss took an employee inside his office and scolded him for not completing the work in time"

What are the alternatives (on the American dialect) that I can substitute instead of the verb "scold"?
A few things I can think of in formal/information situations -

Formal -
"A boss took an employee inside his office and reprimanded him for not completing the work in time"
"A boss took an employee inside his office and criticized him for not completing the work in time"
"A boss took an employee inside his office and rebuked him for not completing the work in time"

Informal -
"A boss took an employee inside his office and told him off for not completing the work in time"
"A boss took an employee inside his office and blasted him not completing the work in time"
"A boss took an employee inside his office and rapped for not completing the work in time"
"A boss took an employee inside his office and thrashed him for not completing the work in time"
"A boss took an employee inside his office and fired him for not completing the work in time" (fired him - not laid off though)

I am looking both the formal (conversation at corporate communications) / informal (conversation between friends, teens) that are in prevalent use today.
If you were an American, how would you frame that sentence. If you have more words to instead scold, then on what preferential order would you use them?

Thx. Appreciate your responses.
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Comments  (Page 2) 
Thanks Clive.

Also,

She cursed me for...
She dissed me for... (US slang)
She cussed me for... (US slang)
?
Hi,

She cursed me for...
She dissed me for... (US slang)
She cussed me for... (US slang)
?

If you want to teach these to your students, you need to discuss suitable contexts in detail.

Why was the person angry?
What kind of person is now saying this? eg educated? uneducated? young? old? member of an urban street culture?

Clive
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Yes Clive. Agreed. Thanks for mentioning it. Emotion: smile