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This is my first post here at the forum. Looking forward for more and more.

Consider this sentence "A boss took an employee inside his office and scolded him for not completing the work in time"

What are the alternatives (on the American dialect) that I can substitute instead of the verb "scold"?
A few things I can think of in formal/information situations -

Formal -
"A boss took an employee inside his office and reprimanded him for not completing the work in time"
"A boss took an employee inside his office and criticized him for not completing the work in time"
"A boss took an employee inside his office and rebuked him for not completing the work in time"

Informal -
"A boss took an employee inside his office and told him off for not completing the work in time"
"A boss took an employee inside his office and blasted him not completing the work in time"
"A boss took an employee inside his office and rapped for not completing the work in time"
"A boss took an employee inside his office and thrashed him for not completing the work in time"
"A boss took an employee inside his office and fired him for not completing the work in time" (fired him - not laid off though)

I am looking both the formal (conversation at corporate communications) / informal (conversation between friends, teens) that are in prevalent use today.
If you were an American, how would you frame that sentence. If you have more words to instead scold, then on what preferential order would you use them?

Thx. Appreciate your responses.
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Hi,

this is my first post here at the forum. Welcome. Emotion: smileLooking forward for more and more.

Consider this sentence "A boss took an employee inside his office and scolded him for not completing the work in time" No, 'scold' is what we do to children.

What are the alternatives (on the American dialect) that I can substitute instead of the verb "scold"?
A few things I can think of in formal/information situations -

Formal -
"A boss took an employee inside his office and reprimanded him for not completing the work in time" Yes
"A boss took an employee inside his office and criticized him for not completing the work in time" Not very natural.
"A boss took an employee inside his office and rebuked him for not completing the work in time" Extremely formal, not natural.
The word 'boss' itself is not really formal. Say eg a manager,. a supervisor.

Informal -
"A boss took an employee inside his office and told him off for not completing the work in time" 'Told off' is very, very natural.
"A boss took an employee inside his office and blasted him not completing the work in time"
"A boss took an employee inside his office and rapped for not completing the work in time" Not very common, in my experience. Maybe teen slang, I don't know.
"A boss took an employee inside his office and thrashed him for not completing the work in time" No. Sounds like physical beating!
"A boss took an employee inside his office and fired him for not completing the work in time" (fired him - not laid off though)

I am looking both the formal (conversation at corporate communications) / informal (conversation between friends, teens) that are in prevalent use today.
formal - reprimand
informal and friends - tell off
teens - I don't know
If you were an American, I'm not. how would you frame that sentence. If you have more words to instead scold, then on what preferential order would you use them?

Clive
That was a pleasing and a bit of a convincing response. Thanks Clive. Nice catch at the word boss.
Your explanations and preferences are self explanatory. What do you think about these two below in informal situations? Have you heard them anytime before?
"A boss took an employee inside his office and blasted him not completing the work in time"
"A boss took an employee inside his office and fired him for not completing the work in time" (fired him - not laid off though)

I remember somone saying the same thing "No, 'scold' is what we do to children". Emotion: big smile
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Hi,

'Blasted him' is not unusual.
Nor is 'fired'.

Clive
ok.'Blasted him' is not unusual. Nor is 'fired'. . Emotion: hmm
Blasted sounds fine to me, but if I use fired, the typical conversation would be

man1: "A boss took an employee inside his office and fired him for not completing the work in time."
man2: Fired? (man2 thinks that the employee was laid off)
man1: oh no! wait! Fired not like fired - laid off - but fired like _____ ?
[Clive, Can you fill in the above conversation?]

And would you arrange the below sentences, in the order you'd prefer (or you think American's would prefer while talking)

Informal -
"A boss took an employee inside his office and told him off for not completing the work in time"
"A boss took an employee inside his office and blasted him not completing the work in time"
"A boss took an employee inside his office and fired him for not completing the work in time" (fired him - not laid off though)
"A boss took an employee inside his office and rapped for not completing the work in time"
"A boss took an employee inside his office and thrashed him for not completing the work in time"
Hi,

Perhaps you don't understand these words.
Fired - you lose your job There can be various reasons, including not completing work on time.
Laid off - you lose your job, usually because you are not needed. You may, or may not, be asked to return later,as is the case with auto factory workers. Probably not.

And would you arrange the below sentences, in the order you'd prefer (or you think American's would prefer while talking)

Informal -
"A boss took an employee inside his office and told him off for not completing the work in time"
"A boss took an employee inside his office and blasted him not completing the work in time"
"A boss took an employee inside his office and fired him for not completing the work in time" (fired him - not laid off though)

1 and 3 cover different situations, so you can't rank them.

#3 is less common.

Clive
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CliveHi,Perhaps you don't understand these words. Fired - you lose your job There can be various reasons, including not completing work on time.Laid off - you lose your job, usually because you are not needed. You may, or may not, be asked to return later,as is the case with auto factory workers. Probably not.And would you arrange the below sentences, in the order you'd prefer (or you think American's would prefer while talking)Informal -"A boss took an employee inside his office and told him off for not completing the work in time""A boss took an employee inside his office and blasted him not completing the work in time""A boss took an employee inside his office and fired him for not completing the work in time" (fired him - not laid off though)1 and 3 cover different situations, so you can't rank them.#3 is less common.Clive
Emotion: hmm Thanks much Clive. That answers everything. Appreciate it.
See you in my next question.
I have noticed people using works like fumed or flared or blew her fuse. While they all essentially mean 'got angry', what are the words or pharases you'd suggest in the following case.

She told me off

Lets say that I am not comfortable with that phrase tell of, or may be I am looking to provide more choices of usage for my students. Can I get some alternatives of 'tell of' please?

She told me off
She blasted me
She ______ me
She ______ me
She ______ me

Pharases, verbs... anything?
Thanks.
She bashed me for....
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