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Hi dears,

I have three questions. Two simple ones and one more difficult one.

1. although / though
Is there a difference in meaning between these two words, or is though simply and abbreviation of although?

2. until / till
Same as 1; can you use these two words interchangeably?

3. what's the difference between these two sentences:
[a.] He picks some flowers, then starts to hurry because it's getting dark
[b.] He picks some flowers and starts hurrying before it gets dark

Please help me out,

Vince
Comments  
Hi Vince,

Your original questions:

1. although / though
Is there a difference in meaning between these two words, or is though simply and abbreviation of although?


2. until / till
Same as 1; can you use these two words interchangeably?


3. what's the difference between these two sentences:
[a.] He picks some flowers, then starts to hurry because it's getting dark
[b.] He picks some flowers and starts hurrying before it gets dark


To answer your questions:

# 1 – For all intents and purposes, you can say that.

2. until / till

# 2 There is a slight difference.

Ex: Mary won’t marry John until he quits smoking. To invert the sentence, we can say ”Until John quits smoking, Mary will not marry him”. If one uses “till” in this sentence, it may still be acceptable. “Until” is used in a situation where one event awaits the outcome of another and can be used at the beginning of a sentence but not “till”

“Till” is used in a situation where only a single event takes place and stops [as a reult of something happened or determined time].

Ex: "Mary sleeps till every Saturday".

“ Mary told me she would be here at 10. I had waited for her till . I didn’t see her “

" Paul kept drinking last nigh till he passed out"

3. what's the difference between these two sentences:

To answer this question, we need to establish whether they are correctly constructed first. To me, there are tense issues. I would say, to make more sense of these two sentences and more grammatically correct, the tense needed to be changed.
[a.] He picked some flowers, then started to hurry [to finish ]because it was getting dark
[b.] He picked some flowers and started hurrying [ to finish ] before it got dark.

You original questions appeared to look and sound the same but in actuality, there is a slight time difference. A –“is getting dark” and B – before it gets dark. Both infinitive or gerund can work in this context.

The context your questions are constructed in contained discrepancy of time and events. It has tense problems.

Hope it helps...
THANKS FOR priceless explanations.
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diffrence between though and although
Hi Vince

1. TMM, although is more common at the beginning of a sentence (but I don't consider though incorrect):
Although it was pouring with rain, he decided to take a walk.

Only though is used in clause equivalents:
Though living in Norway for years, he didn't learn the language properly.

With regard to Nos. 2 and 3, I see no difference in meaning. Webster's Dictionary agrees with me on No. 2:
—Usage. TILL1 and UNTIL are both old in the language and are interchangeable as both prepositions and conjunctions: It rained till (or until) nearly midnight. The savannah remained brown and lifeless until (or till) the rains began. TILL is not a shortened form of UNTIL and is not spelled 'TILL. 'TIL is usually considered a spelling error, though widely used in advertising: Open 'til ten.

Cheers
CB
thanks for the reply
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Wow, what a comprehensive reply/answer; and it cleared up a lot of confusion I'd had about the whole till/'til/until debate.

Thank you - that was really informative.
hi
i need to write 5 sentence with until
but i dont understand how to make
plese help me
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