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Dear teachers,

A/ When should I use :

1) the simple form (past or present):

a) He always reads / b) He always read.

2) the perfect aspect (past or present):

a) He has always read / b) He had always read.

3) the progressive aspect (past or present):

a) He is always reading / b) He was always reading.

Does 1) express a habit whether present or past;

2) an action that started in the past and carries/d on up to a later moment in time; (but in that case what's the difference between 1) and 2) ?

3) either a reproach or a neutral comment depending on the context ?

B/ Now, what's the difference then between :

a) I am always fond of reading. (correct sentence ?) and

b) I have always been fond of reading.

c) I was always fond of reading. (correct sentence?) and

d) I had always been fond of reading.

Kind regards,

Hela
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Hi Hela,

A/ When should I use :

1) the simple form (past or present):

a) He always reads / b) He always read.

2) the perfect aspect (past or present):

a) He has always read / b) He had always read.

3) the progressive aspect (past or present):

a) He is always reading / b) He was always reading.

They all sound OK to me.

Does 1) express a habit whether present or past; Yes.

2) an action that started in the past and carries/d on up to a later moment in time; (but in that case what's the difference between 1) and 2) ? I'd say that the focus is a little different. The simple form focuses on the present.

A: Does Tom get angry when the bus is late. B: No, he doesn't care. He always reads.

The perfect focuses on the past until now.

A: Is it true that Tom doesn't like books? B: No, he has always read. He loves books.

In other words, it's just the standard difference between simple and perfect tenses.

3) either a reproach or a neutral comment depending on the context ? Yes

Hela, I have to rush out the door now. I'll come back later, or someone else may comment on the following. Clive

B/ Now, what's the difference then between :

a) I am always fond of reading. (correct sentence ?) and

b) I have always been fond of reading.

c) I was always fond of reading. (correct sentence?) and

d) I had always been fond of reading.

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Hi,

I'm back.

B/ Now, what's the difference then between :

a) I am always fond of reading. (correct sentence ? Yes) and

b) I have always been fond of reading.

Again. a) focuses more on the present.

A: You don't want to read while you are waiting, do you? B: Yes, I do. I am always fond of reading.

whereas b) has the usual 'past as it affects now' focus.

c) I was always fond of reading. (correct sentence? Yes) This states it as a past fact.

and

d) I had always been fond of reading. This states it as a fact related to some later event in the past.

Best wishes, Clive
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