Hi,
I'm translating a US english source, where the time given for a nighttime occurrence is - "12.27 a.m.", which has me slightly confused (although googling revealed that "12.-something a.m." was not rare). - This is the same as 00.27, or 27 minutes past midnight, right? - How come there is a "13. hour" in the 12 + 12 am/pm nomenclature? - Is it to avoid a construction with "zero hours", as in "it is now zero-twentyseven a.m."?
Tia!
MVH,
T
1 2 3
Hi, I'm translating a US english source, where the time given for a nighttime occurrence is - "12.27 a.m.", which ... revealed that "12.-something a.m." was not rare). - This is the same as 00.27, or 27 minutes past midnight, right?

Yes.
- How come there is a "13. hour" in the 12 + 12 am/pm nomenclature?

There isn't. There are twelve, numbered one through twelve.
- Is it to avoid a construction with "zero hours", as in "it is now zero-twentyseven a.m."?

Given the answer to the above question, I won't even try to understand this one.
Bill
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Hi, I'm translating a US english source, where the time given for a nighttime occurrence is - "12.27 a.m.", which ... revealed that "12.-something a.m." was not rare). - This is the same as 00.27, or 27 minutes past midnight, right?

Yes. US Civilians say 12:27 a.m., and military and police types say
0.27.

Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
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Hi, I'm translating a US english source, where the time given for a nighttime occurrence is - "12.27 a.m.", which ... revealed that "12.-something a.m." was not rare). - This is the same as 00.27, or 27 minutes past midnight, right?

Yes.
- How come there is a "13. hour" in the 12 + 12 am/pm nomenclature?

This is how we save up time for daylight savings time. The last day before DST starts, this is where the hour comes from.
- Is it to avoid a construction with "zero hours", as in "it is now zero-twentyseven a.m."?

I've always thought that two 12 hour portions to the day came before the 24 hour clock. I guess because if the 24 hour clock came first, they would have stuck with it. But if AM and PM came first, they would still need the 24 hour clock to end confusion. Also AM and PM are Latin, so I'm figuring the terms go back a lot of years.

BTW, my second answer wasn't meant seriously.
It's easy to remember if noon is AM or PM. While the very moment of noon is probably neither, the following second is after noon and after the middle of the day, and so are the following 59 seconds and the whole rest of the hour. Hence PM, post meridiem.
Tia! MVH, T

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This pops up all the time on Usenet. Noon is 12m, m being short for "meridiem" which means noon. But 12m is totally confusing since it looks like it means midnight, so I use 12n, myself.

** DAVE HATUNEN (Email Removed) ** * Tucson Arizona, out where the cacti grow * * My typos & mispellings are intentional copyright traps *
MVH,
T
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MVH, T

~~
Tron,
The shipping pilots in the old Panama Canal Zone called zero hours, 27 min
"midnight 27." 12:27 PM was called "Noon 27."
I hope this is helpful.
Cheers, David H
~~
Hi,
MVH, T

~~
Tron,
The shipping pilots in the old Panama Canal Zone called zero hours, 27 min
"midnight 27." 12:27 PM was called "Noon 27."
I hope this is helpful.
- While there is no such thing as too much knowledge ... * The area is Towns River, NJ/USA, a fair distance from the canal itself, AFAIK.
Moreover, the datum appears on screen.
But thx for taking the time.
MVH,
T
* Acording to Ecclesiastes, there is, but there I hold with the Haavamaal.
Yes. This is how we save up time for daylight ... the whole rest of the hour. Hence PM, post meridiem.

This pops up all the time on Usenet. Noon is 12m, m being short for "meridiem" which means noon. But 12m is totally confusing since it looks like it means midnight, so I use 12n, myself.

A good idea. Trying to remember what m is and what M is is another problem even harder than remembering whether noon is am or pm.
A tribute to Erols/RCN/Starpower which took away newsgroups, without giving any notice, in advance or when they did it!!

And a real tribute to http://www.forteinc.com/apn/subscribe.php which starts at 3 dollars for 12 gigs a month,
including alt, misc, the big 8 and everything else, 12 gigs is far more than someone who dl's mostly text should ever need.
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