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OK, so I guess he "goes" in the sense of ... kind of little building with narrow windows along the front.)

Yes. A blind is just a construction built to blend in with the surround so that the hunter is concealed ... Thus, the humans hide in blinds. The blinds also provide storage facilities for food, beer, and additional supplies of ammo.

.. and additional beer.

Skitt (in Hayward, California)
www.geocities.com/opus731/
Odd, that. I would say that 9 out of 10 houses in this area have remotely controlled garage door openers. ... the kitchen, you don't fit out your garage with the devices. Is it that the English like wearing hair shirts?

No, just that they eschew ostentation.

GC
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
Well, now you know.
My wife's great great grandfather stalked, hunted and shot over 1000 of them, which may be why we don't see many around here either.

Steve Hayes from Tshwane, South Africa
http://www.geocities.com/Athens/7734/stevesig.htm
E-mail - see web page, or parse: shayes at dunelm full stop org full stop uk
Odd, that. I would say that 9 out of 10 ... devices. Is it that the English like wearing hair shirts?

No, just that they eschew ostentation.

Ostentation? How is having a garage door opener ostentatious? Do you think that owners of garage door openers flaunt their remotes? Do you think they sit there in their driveways and open and close the door repeatedly to draw attention? Are you under the impression that owners of garage door openers go into the - what do you call it? The irongmongers? - and loudly say they need new batteries for their Genie Garage Door Opener remote?
How do you feel about owning a toaster? A blender? A washer and dryer? Is it customary in Merrie Olde to set your labor-saving devices out in the front garden on weekends so the neighbors will know you have electrical appliances?
You people have garden gnomes, for God's Sake. And badges on the front cow-catchers of your shooting brakes. And you worry about the neighbors thinking you're going over posh because you don't have to get out of the car in the rain?
You'll buy an electric teakettle to heat water .7 seconds faster, but you'll get your plus-fours and diamond-pattern Argyle knit jumpers all soggy in order not to be ostentatious.
Well, I'd think of hounds in relation to hunting, but not horses. What I'd consider the 'normal' kind of hunting is hard to say..

Even in BrE, hunting does not have to involve horses. There are many foxhunts, in areas unsuitable for riding, like ... foxes were adopted as a cheap substitute in the 17th century, when deer became rare in most parts of England.

Hounds used for hunting don't have the definite article, Shirley?

Steve Hayes from Tshwane, South Africa
http://www.geocities.com/Athens/7734/stevesig.htm
E-mail - see web page, or parse: shayes at dunelm full stop org full stop uk
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
No, just that they eschew ostentation.

Ostentation? How is having a garage door opener ostentatious? Do you think that owners of garage door openers flaunt their ... seconds faster, but you'll get your plus-fours and diamond-pattern Argyle knit jumpers all soggy in order not to be ostentatious.

Calm down, Tony, and leave our gnomes alone.
I have reflected on this paradox at some length since my first encounter with an automatic garage door opener (Omaha, Nebraska, 1987). Here are some possible reasons for their rarity:
* in the UK, they are expensive to acquire
* UK garages are often full of stuff other than cars - a typical US dwelling has more floor space than we do and thus more storage space * in many places in the UK, garages are becoming a rarity - why keep space for your car when you can turn it into an extra room? * unlike my experience of US garages, UK garages often don't have direct access into the house (fire regs probably prevent this) so you still have to go out into the weather to close the garage door and enter your home

Laura
(emulate St. George for email)
Harvey Van Sickle filted:

2. They build new houses here with garages that are ... for the storage of general household goods, not for cars".

So it's finally happened...we have "garages" that have nothing to do with the cars, whose "glove compartments" are in turn unlikely ever to hold a glove..r

And whose "cigar lighters" are unlikely ever to light a cigar.

Mike Barnes
Cheshire, England
(Garage door openers in the UK)
I have reflected on this paradox at some length since my first encounter with an automatic garage door opener (Omaha, ... this) so you still have to go out into the weather to close the garage door and enter your home

Many don't have electricity either.
But mainly I think it's because the garages here are smaller. The "double garage" is comparatively rare because of the relatively small number of cars, the price of land in this very crowded island, and the lower proportion of two-car households. I'm not saying a double garage is that unusual but it does tend to indicate a better class of house.

And even our double garages are smaller because of the same pressure on land occupancy, and of course the smaller cars.
Putting car away in a small single garage: light door, no trouble to operate by hand, and it's usually the man of the house. Motorisation a luxury.
Putting car away in a large double garage: heavy door, more difficult to operate by hand, and it's often the woman of the house, who is smaller and weaker. Motorisation very beneficial.
Put that lot together with the association of double garages with better houses, and the fact that your neighbours can see you've got one every time you use it, and you can see why they're considered a bit ostentatious.

Mike Barnes
Cheshire, England
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
You people have garden gnomes, for God's Sake. And badges ... have to get out of the car in the rain?

snip
I have reflected on this paradox at some length since my first encounter with an automatic garage door opener (Omaha, Nebraska, 1987). Here are some possible reasons for their rarity: * in the UK, they are expensive to acquire

That's certainly the perception here, but it's a false one. Our opener a good one, from Seip cost £385, installed, four years ago (we re-used the existing up-and-over door). Hardly a budget-breaker; people are surprised when they find out how little it cost.

snip
* unlike my experience of US garages, UK garages often don't have direct access into the house (fire regs probably prevent this) so you still have to go out into the weather to close the garage door and enter your home

You'd think this would matter, but it doesn't, really: you stay dry while you get all your stuff out of the car and organised, and thus spend less time in the open than if you'd parked in the drive. (You don't close the garage door, of course: it does that itself while you're heading to the house.)
Although it's seen as a bit flash, most of the neighbours appear to think it'd be a nice luxury to have. Being English they don't ask what it cost, but they're invariably surprised that it was only a few hundred.
Best £385 I ever spent on the house...

Cheers, Harvey
Ottawa/Toronto/Edmonton for 30 years;
Southern England for the past 21 years.
(for e-mail, change harvey to whhvs)
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