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An American that goes duck hunting goes to an area ... the ducks to come to him, but he's out hunting.

Thought for a minute there you were going to trot out the old "I dunno Stash, maybe we need to throw the gun higher" number.

Hang on, it was "throw the dog higher", wannit?
No wonder I'm such a hit at parties.

Michael West
As I understand it, if you hit, say, a pheasant, it's illegal for you to stop and pick it up: you've not shot it, so it wasn't a legal killing of game.

What if you catch one with a sticky hat and raisins, as described in Danny Champion of the World?
But if your mate in the car following you sees it, he's entirely free to pick it up and cook it for dinner; it counts as road kill.

Even if it's still alive? :-)
Stewart.

My e-mail is valid but not my primary mailbox, aside from its being the unfortunate victim of intensive mail-bombing at the moment. Please keep replies on the 'group where everyone may benefit.
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(Garage door openers in the UK)

snip
Putting car away in a small single garage: light door, no trouble to operate by hand, and it's usually the man of the house. Motorisation a luxury.

You're absolutely right: light, single-garage doors are indeed no trouble to operate by hand, and there is no way one can justify an opener on the grounds of mechanical utility or need. But in my experience regardless of how easy it was the weight of the garage door is one of the last factors which influences the use/non-use of a garage.
Both my wife and I were seldom inclined to get out of the car to open the garage door manually: we simply didn't store the car away because getting out to open the garage door was bothersome. Looking at the houses here with garages, the rest of the street is similar: almost no one puts their car away, regardless of having small garages with light doors.
So in the absence of an opener, cars usually live in the drive (and the owners live with the inconvenience of things like scraping frost in the winter). After installing one, cars tend to live in the garage and everybody (including the car) is happier with the situation.

I'm certain we'd still be leaving the car in the drive if the door was still manual.

Cheers, Harvey
Ottawa/Toronto/Edmonton for 30 years;
Southern England for the past 21 years.
(for e-mail, change harvey to whhvs)
On 14 May 2004, Mike Barnes wrote

That's actually a rather different issue (NTTAWWT) - I was talking about why electric openers are uncommon and sometimes considered ostentatious.
Both my wife and I were seldom inclined to get out of the car to open the garage door manually: ... of the street is similar: almost no one puts their car away, regardless of having small garages with light doors.

Why do you think your neighbours don't install an opener? Expense and bother (possibly imaginary)? They've filled the garage with junk? They've got two cars and don't want to have to decide which one goes in the garage? Risk of scraping the sides of the car? Risk of being considered "posh"? Danger to the kids (possibly imaginary (the danger, that is))? Technophobia?

Mike Barnes
Cheshire, England
On 14 May 2004, Laura F Spira wrote

snip

I have reflected on this paradox at some length since ... rarity: * in the UK, they are expensive to acquire

That's certainly the perception here, but it's a false one. Our opener a good one, from Seip cost £385, installed, four years ago (we re-used the existing up-and-over door). Hardly a budget-breaker; people are surprised when they find out how little it cost.

You people are getting ripped off. A Genie garage door opener here costs from $160 to $220.
http://www.consumersearch.com/www/house and home/garage door openers/ Installation would be extra, but I've installed one by myself.

We have a double garage, and the opener was almost essential when the house was built. The overhead door was wooden, and a monster to lift. We had it replaced with an aluminum door some years ago, and it slides up and down quite easily.
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Harvey Van Sickle filted:

2. They build new houses here with garages that are ... for the storage of general household goods, not for cars".

So it's finally happened...we have "garages" that have nothing to do with the cars, whose "glove compartments" are in turn unlikely ever to hold a glove..r

My college roommate kept a single glove in his glove compartment on principle. He also had a brief case...
Although it's seen as a bit flash, most of the neighbours appear to think it'd be a nice luxury to have.

My original observation was a reaction to the word "ostentatious". I'd go along with "a bit flash", but "ostentatious" seems a bit overboard for a garage door opener. Something "ostentatious", in my usage, would have to be something very conspicious purchased to display wealth.
Some UK posters have commented about features incorporated into their automobiles like remote door locks and powered seats. I don't see anything more ostentatious about a garage door that can be opened with a remote than I do with an automobile door or trunk/boot that can be opened or unlocked with a remote.
The garage door opener is no more conspicious than the remote door lock device. It's only seen when used, and any curtain-twitching neighbor that notices a garage door opening without a hand touching it is sure to notice a trunk/boot lid magically popping open.

Not that I encourage the UKers to purchase remotely operated garage door openers. In fact, I admire the British for being able to execute that most difficult of maneuvers of being able to open an umbrella whilst (salting the mine of Hiberno-Whatever expressions for Areff) exiting the automobile and not getting drenched in the process. And, the even more difficult maneuver on entering the automobile of closing both the umbrella and the door without crushing the umbrella or getting Wet Arm.
Should Umbrella Drills ever become an Olympic sport, the UK is sure to win the Golds. The "Umbrella Shake", that supple-wristed motion to dislodge the last droplets before putting away the umbrella, and to do it at the exact point where the drops are not scattered in the front hall and no more drops are acquired from the sky, is Coe-like British. Also Brit-specific is the ability to control an umbrella when it is not being used as a shield. The unopened American umbrella never stays propped up for an American, and skitters across the floor in search of legs to trip up.
The ultimate Umbrella Drill would be to put the contestant in front of a door with an umbrella in one hand and a briefcase in the other in a pouring rain. Points would be awarded for the least number of raindrop splotches on the contestant after entering the building. It would not be considered good form to pull open the door handle with one's teeth.
Why do you think your neighbours don't install an opener? Expense and bother (possibly imaginary)? They've filled the garage with ... sides of the car? Risk of being considered "posh"? Danger to the kids (possibly imaginary (the danger, that is))? Technophobia?

What danger is presented by a garage door opener? Most come complete with infra-red light beam device that prevents the door from closing if something is in the path. Drives us nuts. If the dog is out, and my wife comes home, the dog runs into the garage to greet her and trips the device.
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Although it's seen as a bit flash, most of the neighbours appear to think it'd be a nice luxury to have.

My original observation was a reaction to the word "ostentatious". I'd go along with "a bit flash", but "ostentatious" seems a bit overboard for a garage door opener. Something "ostentatious", in my usage, would have to be something very conspicious purchased to display wealth.

I agree (the characterisation as "ostentatious" wasn't mine, and it's a bit strong). "Flash ***" would do it, as that implies a degree of irony that "ostentatious" doesn't.
Now, powered gates to your driveway unless it's too far from the house to be seen that's ostentatious.

Cheers, Harvey
Ottawa/Toronto/Edmonton for 30 years;
Southern England for the past 21 years.
(for e-mail, change harvey to whhvs)
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