There's been quite a debate going on on Wikipedia on the relative meanings of these words. At this time, the discussion has gone quiet but it's by no means out of the way. At the moment it has:

garage
UK:
fuel filling station, e.g. "a Texaco garage"
(+ US meanings)
US:
parking building
vehicle workshop
Firstly, "parking building" is rather ambiguous. At face value, it could mean either:
- an enclosed car park (i.e. a public or otherwise communal parking facility)
- what we Brits know as a garage (i.e. an outbuilding or attachment to a residence where a car might be parked).
Of course, we have the other meanings of 'petrol station' and 'car repair shop' as well, not to mention one or two musical genres the term's been applied to..
The discussion seems to've got rather inconsistent (sorry for the long URL)..
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Talk:List of words having different meanings in British and American English#The Great Garage Debate

So, what exactly do you Americans out there understand by "garage"?
And this entry seems totally made up:
hunting
UK:
pursuing animals on horseback
US:
pursuing animals on foot (UK: shooting or stalking)
In my understanding, it simply refers to pursuing animals, without refrence to the specific means. None of the dictionaries I've checked suggest otherwise, and the same has been said on the American side of things.
Does anyone have any info suggesting otherwise?
Stewart.

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There's been quite a debate going on on Wikipedia on the relative meanings of these words. At this time, the ... British and American English#The Great Garage Debate So, what exactly do you Americans out there understand by "garage"?

1. A structure connected to a dwelling, or separate from the dwellingbut on the same lot, intended for the storage and protection of vehicles.
2. A structure, or a part of a building,primarily intended for thebusiness of the repair of vehicles.
Any other type of garage - a multi-story parking facility, for example - requires some other word to identify it. In this case, "parking garage". Without the extra explanatory word, the default is 1. or 2..

You have to use "intended" in 1. because many garages are actually used for other purposes.
{...)
this entry seems totally made up:
hunting UK: pursuing animals on horseback US: pursuing animals on foot (UK: shooting or stalking) In my understanding, it simply ... otherwise, and the same has been said on the American side of things. Does anyone have any info suggesting otherwise?

Can't speak for AmE, but I think BrE "hunting" to describe a sport or country activity does imply pursuit on horseback by at least some participants. (Obviously there are quite other senses - searching for some elusive object, or police pursuing a criminal.) If someone says he or she has enjoyed a day's hunting, I envisage hounds and horses and people in scarlet coats pursuing a fox. If they had been trying to kill deer, they would have been "stalking", while "shooting" would imply game-birds or perhaps rabbits. There's a lot of hunting in these parts - i.e. Wiltshire and neighbouring counties - and shooting, and I hear both terms often enough to know that they mean different things.
Alan Jones
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1. A structure connected to a dwelling, or separate from the dwelling but on the same lot, intended for the ... word to identify it. In this case, "parking garage". Without the extra explanatory word, the default is 1. or 2..

That's simply a car park over here. The term applies equally whether it's open air or covered. Is this a distinction between "parking garage" and "parking lot" on your side?
You have to use "intended" in 1. because many garages are actually used for other purposes.

Same here, I think the average garage in sense 1 is used for storing things other than the car.
Stewart.

My e-mail is valid but not my primary mailbox, aside from its being the unfortunate victim of intensive mail-bombing at the moment. Please keep replies on the 'group where everyone may benefit.
"Alan Jones" (Email Removed) schrieb im Newsbeitrag
{...) this entry seems totally made up:

hunting UK: pursuing animals on horseback US: pursuing animals on ... side of things. Does anyone have any info suggesting otherwise?

Can't speak for AmE, but I think BrE "hunting" to describe a sport or country activity does imply pursuit on ... Wiltshire and neighbouring counties - and shooting, and I hear both terms oftenenough to know that they mean different things.

But when Asterix and Obelix go hunting for wild boar, do you imagine horses and hounds?
Often, Brits use "hunt" to mean "fox-hunt", complete with silly red jackets, but the word is used in other contexts as well. In the stone age, people hunted long before they managed to domesticate horses.
(snip)
Often, Brits use "hunt" to mean "fox-hunt",

Unless they're the hunters, in which case they call it "riding to hounds".
complete with silly red

Pink.
jackets, but the word is used in other contexts as well. In the stone age, people hunted long before they managed to domesticate horses.

When I hear the word hunting I only think of fox hunting. Deers are stalked, other animals are shot, I don't think of that as hunting.

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(about BrE) If someone says he or she has enjoyed ... horses and people in scarlet coats pursuing a fox

But when Asterix and Obelix go hunting for wild boar, do you imaginehorses and hounds? Often, Brits use "hunt" to ... is used in other contexts as well. In the stone age, people hunted long before they managed to domesticate horses.

Agreed, of course: there are more general senses, some not involving animals at all and some appropriate to life in earlier times. I was describing what the term customarily means in the context of present-day rural life in the UK, as perhaps was the lexicographer cited. We all know what the campaign to ban "hunting" means, even if the newspaper omits the qualification "with dogs" and doesn't mention horses or foxes at all.

There is also an interest in hunting with beagles (no horses, people all on foot seeking to kill hares, I believe), but that would usually be called "beagling" rather than simply "hunting".
Alan Jones
"Demetrius Zeluff" (Email Removed) schrieb im Newsbeitrag
jackets, but the word is used in other contexts as well. In the stone age, people hunted long before they managed to domesticate horses.

When I hear the word hunting I only think of fox hunting. Deers are stalked, other animals are shot, I don't think of that as hunting.

So, as a Brit, I should refer to shooter-stalker-gatherers?
When I hear the word hunting I only think of ... animals are shot, I don't think of that as hunting.

So, as a Brit, I should refer to shooter-stalker-gatherers?

Hang on.
"when I hear the word hunting I only think of fox hunting, *** unless it is a reference to pre-history ***"
(Just about covers it.)

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