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Charles Riggs gosled:

While on the subject, the butter isn't half as good ... more like there is little taste to it at all.

Are you buying butter? Check the ingredients: the only ones should be cream and, optionally, salt and/or flavoring. If it ... because I've noticed that butter-like things are both easier to find than butter and marketed as if they were butter.

I know that this is not near you, but those in Portland might enjoy the butter mentioned here:



12.30.04: This is not a new subject but there are some new Lithuanianproducts out there worth mentioning:
European Deli located next to Ross and west of the Vancouver Mall (in Washington) has the Lithuanian wedding cake ...

Another store called Premier located on Fourth Plain (west of 117th in Washington) has rye breads from Latvia. $2.99 a loaf, dark rye, white rye and sour rye.
They have Latvian butter Sviets.


Ref.: http://www.portlandlithuanians.org/announcements.htm

The very last word of the above is misspelled and should be "sviests".

In days of yore, Latvia exported premium butter to many countries.
Skitt (in Hayward, California)
www.geocities.com/opus731/
Sorry. I Can't Believe It's Not Butter.

john
Try out our live chat room.
Speaking of the Netherlands, I remember a point of confusion with gas stations. The locals wouldn't understand what a ``gas ... (must be a calque from the Dutch, which I do not know at all; the German Tankstelle comes to mind).

A couple of others you might try: "benzine" (ben-zeen-uh) is gasoline/petrol and "pomp" is a pump and also a gas station.
Also, in Germany (forget about the Netherlands), Germans speaking English used the noun ``handy'' to refer to a mobile telephone (``call me on my handy when you get there''). Can you think of other pseudo-English words or phrases?

I'd be careful what you call "pseudo". "Hand" is in all the Germanic languages.

Best - Donna Richoux
On 31 Jan 2005 11:27:55 -0500, stanislav shalunov
You might wish to try ``European-style'' butter, sometimes known as ``cultured butter'' (the latter is more correct cultured butter is eaten in Asia and probably elsewhere (everywhere but the US?) -

Oh ho! I looked and there it was (I'm in western Canada). Four different brands too. I thought butter only came in salted and unsalted. There was even some that claimed to be "Normandy style" butter.
For a newsgroup devoted to a language, there certainly a lot of culinary hints in here! Thank you.
When we went to Switzerland on vacation, we thought the ... can find is plain Dutch butter - adequate but dull.

I didn't realize that Dutch butter was dull.

In comparison. You know the line, "How are you going to keep 'em down on the farm, after they've seen Paree?" I didn't know Dutch butter was dull, either, until I tasted that delightful Swiss stuff.
I remember the thing that surprised me about the Dutch dairy products: regular milk (AmE ``whole milk'') had 4.2% milk fat content.

Why is that surprising? It's the same in the US. Whole milk has about 4% fat, two-percent-milk has 2% fat, and skim milk has 0% fat. Those categories are called whole, half-whole, and lean in Dutch. I suppose you're saying that whole milk somewhere else is quite different?

Best Donna Richoux
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Germans speaking English used the noun ``handy'' to refer to a mobile telephone . Can you think of other pseudo-English words or phrases?

I'd be careful what you call "pseudo". "Hand" is in all the Germanic languages.

So?
I understand that in German, the word ``handy'' is often used to refer to cell phones (I heard it in Berlin and Hamburg spoken by people from various parts of Germany; in addition, Google gives 1,780,000 hits for "das Handy", with all of the ones I perused in German). This word is understood by German speakers (those that I checked with) as a borrowing from English, where it is supposed to mean ``a portable battery-powered phone radio communications device with PSTN access.'' Consequently, when speaking English, some Germans will use ``handy'' to refer to a cellular telephone (for them, it's an English word). (Naturally, English, as it is used outside of Germany, does not have the word ``handy'' as a noun at all.)
That Proto-Germanic (supposedly) had a word ``*handuz'' that meant ``hand'' is not pertinent: Proto-Germanic didn't have a word for ``mobile telephone.'' And, of course, nouns aren't formed in German that way (``das Handy''); that is why the word is so easily and universally perceived as a borrowing.
As http://www.etymologie.info/~e/d /de-kontak.html puts it,

'Handy' ist eine Scheinentlehnung aus dem Englischen, d.h. im Englischen existiert diese Bezeichnung nicht mit dieser Bedeutung.
As to my use of ``pseudo-'': German, too, has this Pseudoentlehnung word that means the same thing as Scheinentlehnung .

Phantom borrowing, as opposed to a calque.
I was asking about other phantom borrowings returned to English (like ``handy,'' which appears in web searches limited to .nl in what looks like the ``cell phone'' meaning) and ostensible meaning-distorting calques (like ``tank station,'' which I have heard used in the Netherlands in English and actually was forced to use to get the meaning across but could not verify as a calque due to the fact that I know no Dutch) that you might have encountered while living in the Netherlands.

Stanislav Shalunov http://www.internet2.edu/~shalunov/

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Many in the US wrongly believe 2% milk has only 2% of the fat of whole milk because no one calls whole milk "4%".

dg (domain=ccwebster)
Why is that surprising? It's the same in the US. Whole milk hasabout 4% fat, two-percent-milk has 2% fat, and skim milk has 0% fat.Those categories are called whole, half-whole, and lean in Dutch. Isuppose you're saying that whole milk somewhere else is quite different?

Quality milk Channel Island milk runs about 6%, I think. In a bottle it looks a lot more, of course.
Mike.
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
I remember the thing that surprised me about the Dutch dairy products: regular milk (AmE ``whole milk'') had 4.2% milk fat content.

Why is that surprising? It's the same in the US. Whole milk has about 4% fat, two-percent-milk has 2% fat, ... are called whole, half-whole, and lean in Dutch. I suppose you're saying that whole milk somewhere else is quite different?

Coming from Russia, I was used to milk having 3.5% milk fat. In the US, the FDA uses 3.25% as ``whole milk'' definition. (1)

(I don't actually drink raw or pasteurized milk, so I have no idea if the different fat percentage yields a perceptible difference in taste, but I have to buy milk regularly, and woe unto me if I get the wrong stuff.)
(1) Reproduced at http://www.nutritiondata.com/facts-001-02s001x.html

Stanislav Shalunov http://www.internet2.edu/~shalunov/

"You wake me up early in the morning to tell me I am right? Please wait until I am wrong." John von Neumann, on being phoned at 10 a.m.
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