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I imagine eggs taste like what the chickens have been fed.

I hope shrimp doesn't taste like *** mixed with rotting garbage to you. What cooked dead animals taste like has ... can affect how tough the meat is andperhaps some other details, but I don't believe the taste will be affected.

It does matter with eggs and milk, though. Depends on the feed, of course; but either can be tainted. Actually, you probably remember those fishy-tasing chickens we sometimes got in the 'sixties: this was a consequence of a diet including too much fish-meal too late in the bird's life.
Mike.
If this has already been mentioned, I apologize. The milk that comes directly from a cow is not "whole milk".

That's hard to accept. I would have found it more nearly credible if you had said the so-called "whole milk" you buy in a store is not whole milk, because it has had some of the fat removed from it, so that it's not quite as rich as the real whole milk that comes from the cow.
Here's the definition of "whole milk" from the New Shorter Oxford English Dictionary :
whole milk - milk with none of its fats or other
constituents removed;
To accord with your definition, they would have to replace "none" by "some", or "a little".
I would think milk sellers would run afoul of regulations if they called something "whole milk" that was not whole milk. If the stuff in the stores is not whole milk, I would expect to find it labeled with some sort of weasel wording that gives the impression it's whole milk without saying so. I'll have to remember next time I'm at the market to see what the labels really say. If it's labeled "whole milk", I will choose to believe that it's indeed whole milk, with none of the fat removed.
I'm reminded of the man in Florida who made jeans under the brand name "Red Fox" and put a cute label on them with an image of a red fox. Some bureaucrat got after him and forced him to remove the name, because none of the material in the jeans came from red foxes.
"Whole milk" is simply an arbitrary fat percentage arrived at after a certain amount of cream has separated from the raw milk. You can remove as much fat as you want.

That must be why we can buy two-percent-fat milk,
one-percent-fat milk, and zero-percent-fat milk, which is also called "skim milk".
Also, around here the cows used for milk are usually Guernseys.

According to the table I mentioned earlier, at
www.usda.am/graf report.doc , their milk is almost as rich as Jersey milk.
Fat in milk from five breeds
Holstein 3.7%
Ayrshire 4.0%
Brown Swiss 4.2%
Guernsey 4.9%
Jersey 5.1%
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Speaking of the Netherlands, I remember a point of confusion ... there''). Can you think of other pseudo-English words or phrases?

I was watching a '50s detective movie, and the detective jarred me by flipping open a note pad with the same motion you nowadays flip open a cell phone. I kept waiting for him to talk into it - it was a time-o.

I redd in some science-fiction story the noun "personal" to mean a restroom. One of the remarks was something like "Men in the personal never speak to each other, it being considered bad manners to do so."
I redd in some science-fiction story the noun "personal" to mean a restroom. One of the remarks was something like "Men in the personal never speak to each other, it being considered bad manners to do so."

Isaac Asimov: The Caves of Steel and the other Elijah Bailey novels.

As his character pointed out however, women did a lot of talking in the 'personals'. ;-)>
Heinlein used the term 'refresher' or 'fresher'.

David Wright
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If this has already been mentioned, I apologize. The milk that comes directly from a cow is not "whole milk".

That's hard to accept. I would have found it more nearly credible if you had said the so-called "whole milk" ... removed from it, so that it's not quite as rich as the real whole milk that comes from the cow.(snip)

I was engaged once to a girl who's father was a dairy farmer. While it might be nice to believe that milk comes straight out of the cow and into the jug you buy at the store, it doesn't work that way.

He told me that the first thing they do is separate the cream from the milk in a centrifugal separator. The resulting cream is something like 50% fat or so, I think. The cream is used for ice cream, butter, half-and-half, whipping cream, etc. What's left over is added back to what he always called "beverage milk". Depending on how much is put back, you get "whole milk", 2%, 1%, skim, etc. Then it has to be homogenized so that it doesn't separate on its own again in the store. Buttermilk is what is left over when butter is churned out of cream.
Don
Kansas City
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Speaking of the Netherlands, I remember a point of confusion ... there''). Can you think of other pseudo-English words or phrases?

I was watching a '50s detective movie, and the detective jarred me by flipping open a note pad with the same motion you nowadays flip open a cell phone. I kept waiting for him to talk into it - it was a time-o.

Like that scene in "Star Trek IV" where someone hands Scotty a computer mouse and he holds to his mouth and says "Computer!".
dg (domain=ccwebster)
The dairy farmer I mentioned earlier, Jake van (Vandyke?), was from Friesland. I think he told me that Frisian was more like English than it was like Dutch.

"... The kingdom of Mercia was founded by Frisians, whose dialect (called Mercian after the name of their kingdom) was the forerunner of our Midland dialect, and through this of modern standard English. There is a well-known couplet, every word of which is said to be both Friesic (of the Continent) and English:-
Good butter and good cheese
Is good English and good Fries."
Nesfield, English Grammar Past and Present (of which Mike Lyle also has a copy- page 229 in my edition, Mike).
Strictly on-topic for the world of dairy. And I think those black-and-white Friesian cows are a relatively recent introduction to British dairy farms. I remember Jerseys, one even by name. Hi, Prune! How's it going?

Paul
In bocca al Lupo!
There is a well-known couplet, every word of which is said to beboth Friesic (of the Continent) and English:- Good ... Nesfield, English Grammar Past and Present (of which Mike Lyle also has a copy- page 229 in my edition, Mike).

Same in mine.
Strictly on-topic for the world of dairy. And I think those black-and-white Friesian cows are a relatively recent introductionto British dairy farms. I remember Jerseys, one even by name. Hi, Prune! How's it going?

Yes, I think the classic British dairy breeds were Dairy Shorthorn and Ayrshire, used till the 'fifties or so. Friesians (of which Holsteins are a variety) are bigger, and have been bred to produce increasing quantities of poor-quality milk. Regardless of whether or not it's pleasant to be one of these poor steamed-up creatures; but they aren't kept alive officiously long, though. Most of today's lousy beef is them and their annual offspring.
Mike.
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
The dairy farmer I mentioned earlier, Jake van (Vandyke?), ... Frisian was more like English than it was like Dutch.

"... The kingdom of Mercia was founded by Frisians, whose dialect (called Mercian after the name of their kingdom) was ... to be both Friesic (of the Continent) and English:- Good butter and good cheese Is good English and good Fries."

That gets quoted regularly here, but I'm not positive it's genuine. Once I found a Frisian version:
In Frisian that's "Goed bûter en goed tsiis- is goed Ingelsk en goed Frysk."

But is that genuine folklore or someone's recent attempt to make a back-translation? I also found this (quoting an earlier post of mine):
One site about Frisian says that a similar phrase was ... would mean it was used to illustrate differences, not similarities.

That one looks more likely to me somehow... Googling now on , I get 62 more pages with that second saying pages in Dutch, that call it a familiar saying.
But searching on gives me only one. Like I say, I'm doubtful about that first version.
(Google's archives have gone hyphen-mad every post is littered with them. I removed a few above.)
Strictly on-topic for the world of dairy. And I think those black-and-white Friesian cows are a relatively recent introduction to British dairy farms.

British Friesian Breeders Club Website/history
http://www.britishfriesian.co.uk/bfbchist.html

Best Donna Richoux
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