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It does matter with eggs and milk, though. Depends on the feed, of course; but either can be tainted. Actually, ... in the 'sixties: this was a consequence of a diet including too much fish-meal too late in the bird's life.

Is that authenticated? When we were in Zambia the chooks were fed almost entirely on fish meal, or so I was told by a farmer, but they didn't taste fishy. The fishy taste of UK birds may have been a result of some other form of mistreatment handed out to them.
Mike Page
It does matter with eggs and milk, though. Depends on ... diet including too much fish-meal too latein the bird's life.

Is that authenticated? When we were in Zambia the chooks were fed almost entirely on fish meal, or so I ... fishy taste of UK birds may have been a result of some other form of mistreatment handed out to them.

Interesting: maybe it was something else, then. I was actually thinking of some Danish ones they used to export all over the place, in my case to the middle East. I'm imbued with the notion that if you use fish-meal as the protein component, you have to cut it out a couple of weeks before slaughter: never used it when I had my own birds, anyhow. I wonder what they might have done to impart fishiness.
Mike.
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
(snip) I was engaged once to a girl who's father was a dairy farmer. While it might be nice to believe that milk comes straight out of the cow and into the jug you buy at the store, it doesn't work that way.

You seem to think I said something like that, so you evidently didn't read carefully what I said. You've quoted an important part of it above. Read it again.
Anyone who wants to know in full what I really did say can find it in Message-ID:
It does matter with eggs and milk, though. Depends on ... including too much fish-meal too late in the bird's life.

Is that authenticated? When we were in Zambia the chooks were fed almost entirely on fish meal, or so I ... fishy taste of UK birds may have been a result of some other form of mistreatment handed out to them.

When my American friend Barbara came to live in England in the mid 1970s she was horrified by the chicken I served her and insisted that it tasted fishy. It didn't taste fishy to me, until I tasted an Empire corn-fed chicken she brought me from the PX at the air force base. Then I realised what she meant. Kosher chicken has improved since then, though.

Laura
(emulate St. George for email)
Like that scene in "Star Trek IV" where someone hands Scotty a computer mouse and he holds to his mouth and says "Computer!".

I was thinking on the way home that all cell phones open like switchblades, but I want one that opens like a stiletto.
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
Like that scene in "Star Trek IV" where someone hands Scotty a computer mouse and he holds to his mouth and says "Computer!".

I was thinking on the way home that all cell phones open like switchblades, but I want one that opens like a stiletto.

I think only the Italian models offer that option.
dg (domain=ccwebster)
Holsteins are for milking and Angus are for eating{and making baseball gloves}. At least that's how we do it in America.
That's the one I learned at my Daddy's knee (modulo some slight spelling differences) Both my parents were born and raised in Friesland (Fryslân) and I heard a mixture of Dutch, Frisian, English, Swahili and Luganda being spoken around me as a toddler. Apparently I had no difficulty conversing and switching instantaneously between them depending on whom I was speaking to - except that I mixed Frisian and Dutch willy-nilly because my parents used both on a regular basis.

It was only when I eventually got a job and lived in Holland for a few years that I really became conscious that Dutch and Frisian were two distinct languages, and I had to learn which was which so that I could speak Dutch in day-to-day business life.

Jitze
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
When we went to Switzerland on vacation, we thought the ... can find is plain Dutch butter - adequate but dull.

I didn't realize that Dutch butter was dull. I remember the thing that surprised me about the Dutch dairy products: ... of other pseudo-English words or phrases? Stanislav Shalunov http://www.internet2.edu/~shalunov/ This message is designed to be viewed at room temperature.

Many Danes also use "tank station" when speaking English; a small flaw in their usually excellent English. However, I don't recall one who did not understand "petrol station" or "gas station". I believe that the explanation is a calque from the Danish.
It is not just the Germans who use English loan words oddly. Consider "parking" and "smoking" in French. =20

Se=E1n O'Leathl=F3bhair
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