Can anyone tell me why the eggs taste so odd here? I don't notice the difference between them and their cousins in Ireland unless I hard boil them, then the difference can't be missed. Holds for white ones, brown ones, free range ones and the other ones.
No serial comma belongs there, I believe, because I was comparing the free range kind to the other kind, whatever they are called. A ham and eggs type of thing, sort of.
While on the subject, the butter isn't half as good as Irish butter, but I wouldn't say it tasted odd: more like there is little taste to it at all.

Charles Riggs
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While on the subject, the butter isn't half as good as Irish butter, but I wouldn't say it tasted odd: more like there is little taste to it at all.

You might wish to try ``European-style'' butter, sometimes known as ``cultured butter'' (the latter is more correct cultured butter is eaten in Asia and probably elsewhere (everywhere but the US?) but the former might be more familiar to store employees). There are about five US producers of cultured butter. The ingredients' list has to include microbial cultures or something similar. Otherwise, you'll get the tasteless American variety.
(Then, of course, you could simply buy imported French butter, but it's ridiculously expensive and tastes stale after all the shipping and storage.)

Stanislav Shalunov http://www.internet2.edu/~shalunov/

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Today, Charles Riggs (Email Removed) gosled:
Holds for white ones, brown ones, free range ones and the other ones. No serial comma belongs there, I believe, because I was comparing the free range kind to the other kind, whatever they are called. A ham and eggs type of thing, sort of.

Itym "Holds for white ones and brown ones, free-range ones and the other ones".
While on the subject, the butter isn't half as good as Irish butter, but I wouldn't say it tasted odd: more like there is little taste to it at all.

Are you buying butter? Check the ingredients: the only ones should be cream and, optionally, salt and/or flavoring. If it includes oil, then (a) it's not butter and (b) it has no taste.
I only ask because I've noticed that butter-like things are both easier to find than butter and marketed as if they were butter.

Michael Hamm
AM, Math, Wash. U. St. Louis
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Charles Riggs filted:
Can anyone tell me why the eggs taste so odd here? I don't notice the difference between them and their ... them, then the difference can't be missed. Holds for white ones, brown ones, free range ones and the other ones.

Can you describe the difference in flavor?...that may help to identify the source of the variation..
While on the subject, the butter isn't half as good as Irish butter, but I wouldn't say it tasted odd: more like there is little taste to it at all.

That's one you'll have to take up with the cows..r
While on the subject, the butter isn't half as good ... more like there is little taste to it at all.

You might wish to try ``European-style'' butter, sometimes known as ``cultured butter'' (the latter is more correct cultured butter is eaten in Asia and probably elsewhere (everywhere but the US?)

When we went to Switzerland on vacation, we thought the butter had a delightful tang, zip, zing to it, like sourdough bread or cheese. Back home in the Netherlands, we looked for alternatives but all we can find is plain Dutch butter - adequate but dull. (Probably government monopoly, all those farms to subsidize.) I'll watch hopefully for any signs of "cultured butter."

Best - Donna Richoux
An American living in the Netherlands
Different types of cows have different cream amounts in their milk s. The Holstein the basic commercial cow gives the largest volumn of milk and it has less cream. A family cow would usually be a different breed as you don't need as much milk but would want more cream.
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Can anyone tell me why the eggs taste so odd here? I don't notice the difference between them and their ... as Irish butter, but I wouldn't say it tasted odd: more like there is little taste to it at all.

Get the butter without salt. Leave out for a while.
When we went to Switzerland on vacation, we thought the butter had a delightful tang, zip, zing to it, like ... in the Netherlands, we looked for alternatives but all we can find is plain Dutch butter - adequate but dull.

I didn't realize that Dutch butter was dull. I remember the thing that surprised me about the Dutch dairy products: regular milk (AmE ``whole milk'') had 4.2% milk fat content.
Speaking of the Netherlands, I remember a point of confusion with gas stations. The locals wouldn't understand what a ``gas station'' was. ``Petrol station'' (the BrE term) would elicit equally blank stares. Several of the locals used the term ``tank station'' in English (must be a calque from the Dutch, which I do not know at all; the German Tankstelle comes to mind). Also, in Germany (forget about the Netherlands), Germans speaking English used the noun ``handy'' to refer to a mobile telephone (``call me on my handy when you get there''). Can you think of other pseudo-English words or phrases?

Stanislav Shalunov http://www.internet2.edu/~shalunov/

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Can anyone tell me why the eggs taste so odd here? I don't notice the difference between them and their ... them, then the difference can't be missed. Holds for white ones, brown ones, free range ones and the other ones.

Can you describe the differences in taste a little more?

Steny '08!
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