+0
Hi,
I'd like to know if somewhere in the UK there are some features that can be found in American English. I'll try to describe some of the features I'm curious about, I hope you'll understand what I mean, because I won't use phonetic symbols and so my transcriptions won't be accurate. However, I hope you'll recognize the features I'm trying to describe:
  • s + y = sh (this year ----> this sheer)
  • t + y = ch (but you -----> buh chyoo, don't you -----> don chyoo, can't you ---->can chyoo,...)
  • d + y ----> the d becomes j as in junior, in cases like: did you, would you, could you,...
  • z sound + y = s as in pleasure (for example, the s in "as you know" sounds like the s in pleasure)
  • American "o" (not, god, cop, top, shop, stop, shock... pronounced like in American English, where that "o" is a kind of "ah")
  • tapped t, some t's become slight d's (put it away -----> puddid away, about it -----> aboudit)
  • the vowel in words like "talk, walk, call, all" pronounced the American way, where that vowel is more open.
  • the diphthong in words like "no, so, low, owe", pronounced the American way.
Are those features found somewhere or sometimes in the UK? And if there's something similar in the UK, who speaks like that and where do people talk that way?

Thank you in advance Emotion: smile
1 2
Comments  
>> z sound + y = s as in pleasure (for example, the s in "as you know" sounds like the s in pleasure) <<
>> s + y = sh (this year ----> this sheer) <<

These two are actually not found in General American, especially the first one.

>> American "o" (not, god, cop, top, shop, stop, shock... pronounced like in American English, where that "o" is a kind of "ah") <<

It's [ A ] or [ O ] or [ Q ] or [ a ] in different North American dialcets.

>> tapped t, some t's become slight d's (put it away -----> puddid away, about it -----> aboudit) <<

In North American English they become flaps not d's.

>> the diphthong in words like "no, so, low, owe", pronounced the American way. <<

Some dialects have monophthongs for those.
Marvin A.>> z sound + y = s as in pleasure (for example, the s in "as you know" sounds like the s in pleasure) <<
>> s + y = sh (this year ----> this sheer) <<

These two are actually not found in General American, especially the first one.

>> American "o" (not, god, cop, top, shop, stop, shock... pronounced like in American English, where that "o" is a kind of "ah") <<

It's [ A ] or [ O ] or [ Q ] or [ a ] in different North American dialcets.

>> tapped t, some t's become slight d's (put it away -----> puddid away, about it -----> aboudit) <<

In North American English they become flaps not d's.

>> the diphthong in words like "no, so, low, owe", pronounced the American way. <<

Some dialects have monophthongs for those.

Yes, but I was just trying to describe some features that can be found in American English (I didn't say "general American"). Very few people understand phonetic symbols, so I wanted to point out some well known features without trying to describe those features accurately (I probably described them very poorly, but if anyone wants a more precise description in my post, I'll provide it).

So now let's see if anyone from the UK feels like giving their opinions...
PS: I said "anyone from the UK", well, the others are free to give their opinions as well, of course Emotion: smile
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies

It’s rather hard to work out quite what you are looking for here. Some of these features – as Marvin A was pointing out – are not specifically American English pronunciation, but the allophonic variation that occurs in connected speech. That is, the pronunciation of some sounds is influenced by the sounds around them because of the way you have to move your lips, tongue, velum and so forth to get from one sound to another. Thus, your first four examples show the impact of the following “y” /j/ sound, and this is not specific to either a British or American accent.

The American pronunciation of “o” in your next example wouldn’t be found in any regional accent of British English that I can call to mind immediately, though there is considerable variation in the pronunciation of this sound – for example, in , and the West Country. Similarly, there are variations in the pronunciation of the “talk, walk, call” vowel and the “no, so, low” diphthong from region to region – but none that I can think of that are close enough to the American pronunciation to be considered the same.

The tap/flap is quite a distinctive feature of American English. It’s not in the standard British English inventory, but you might hear it in some Irish accents.

Overall, there is no regional accent of British English which could be mistaken for American English, in my opinion.

Lil’ Ruby Rose
Anonymous

The American pronunciation of “o” in your next example wouldn’t be found in any regional accent of British English that I can call to mind immediately, though there is considerable variation in the pronunciation of this sound – for example, in , and the West Country. Similarly, there are variations in the pronunciation of the “talk, walk, call” vowel and the “no, so, low” diphthong from region to region – but none that I can think of that are close enough to the American pronunciation to be considered the same.

The tap/flap is quite a distinctive feature of American English. It’s not in the standard British English inventory, but you might hear it in some Irish accents.

I've heard British singers who tap their t's, pronounce the o's in "not, god, etc." like the "a" in "car", ect. Is that because they want to imitate an American Accent, then? Robbie Williams sings that way, he's British, so what kind of British accent does he have?



I've heard British singers who tap their t's, pronounce the o's in "not, god, etc." like the "a" in "car", ect. Is that because they want to imitate an American Accent, then? Robbie Williams sings that way, he's British, so what kind of British accent does he have?

All singers sort of lose their accent when singing. North American singers become non-rhotic, British singers use something like /a/ for most /a/like vowels. The point of articulation is in the middle of the mouth. It's just because it's easier and it sounds better. It's not because they're trying to imitate another accent, it's more because of the sound quality. Other changes that sometimes occur: initial consonants are devoiced-this is not found in any dialect of English. /aI/ is almost always realized as [ a ] followed by [ i ] regardless of the dialect that the singer speaks.
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Marvin’s right, but there is also a tendency / convention among British pop singers to deliberately adopt a more American pronunciation when singing – and conversely, some singers who very deliberately don’t Americanise their accents in song – for example, Lily Allen or The Streets.

Robbie Williams comes from , so has a distinct regional accent when he’s talking. He sometimes reverts to this in his music, particularly when he’s talking or rapping. I can’t remember the specific song (it may be the one that’s called something like Rock DJ), but there’s a spoken section which includes phrases like “back up”, where his Mancunian accent is particularly strong.

Lil’ Ruby Rose
Ah, now things are getting clear...

I've never heard Robbie Williams's natural accent, I've only heard the accent he uses in his songs. If those accent are different from each other, then he must be trying to Americanize his songs. And so it seems he's not the only one who tries to Americanize songs.

Thanks.
KooyeenAnd so it seems he's not the only one who tries to Americanize songs.
You're right, he isn't: Elton John is another good example of this hmm... phenomenon.
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Show more