Both of these pronounciations are wrong, IMHO! :-D

I've never heard an American pronounce 'macabre' correctly, but, blessum, they can do lots of other things! :-D
Many Englishmen also struggle with 'macabre' but *I* can pronounce it! :-D
Can you, my little pumpernickels? :-D
The French have got it down to a tee, lol!
Pierre from Gascony
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http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/macabre Both of these pronounciations are wrong, IMHO! :-D I've never heard an American pronounce 'macabre' correctly, but, blessum, they can do lots of other things! :-D

"macabre" is an English word. It was stolen from French, but when it is used by English speakers it is English.
Both those pronunciation are correct for the English word "macabre".
Many Englishmen also struggle with 'macabre' but *I* can pronounce it! :-D Can you, my little pumpernickels? :-D The French have got it down to a tee, lol! Pierre from Gascony

Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.english.usage)
Both of these pronounciations are wrong, IMHO!

What has your opinion got to do with it? The right way to pronounce "macabre" in American English is the way Americans pronounce it.

Your spelling (and by implication your pronunciation) of "pronunciation" is certainly wrong, however.
The French have got it down to a tee, lol!

French pronounce the French word "macabre" correctly, but in my experience they don't pronounce the English word "macabre" correctly.

athel
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Both of these pronounciations are wrong, IMHO! :-D I've never heard an American pronounce 'macabre' correctly, but, blessum, they ... :-D Can you, my little pumpernickels? :-D The French have got it down to a tee, lol! Pierre from Gascony

You should visit the American Mid-West. The pronunciation of various place names of French origin is truly bizarre.

GFH
Both of these pronounciations are wrong, IMHO! :-D I've ... got it down to a tee, lol! Pierre from Gascony

You should visit the American Mid-West. The pronunciation of various place names of French origin is truly bizarre.

My own favorite is a city in my own home state of Indiana: Versailles. Call it anything but "Ver-sales" any people look at you funny.

Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
You should visit the American Mid-West. The pronunciation of various place names of French origin is truly bizarre.

My own favorite is a city in my own home state of Indiana: Versailles. Call it anything but "Ver-sales" any people look at you funny.

Nothing new there! The WW1 battle of Ypres was always pronounced "wipers".
With best wishes,
Peter.

Peter, \ / \ Prestbury, Cheltenham, Glos. GL52 Anne \ / \ England. and / / \ > > >\ > / \ http://pnyoung.orpheusweb.co.uk family / \ / \ / > \> \ / \ (Email Removed).
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My own favorite is a city in my own home state of Indiana: Versailles. Call it anything but "Ver-sales" any people look at you funny.

They don't do much better with Spanish. I have a relative who married into the name Vallejo. They pronounce it 'Valley-Joe'. Makes my eye twitch every time.

Carl Flippin > Some people, when confronted with a problem, (Email Removed) > think "I know, I'll use regular expressions". http://www.photocarl.org > Now they have two problems. - jwz
Both of these pronounciations are wrong, IMHO! :-D I've ... got it down to a tee, lol! Pierre from Gascony

You should visit the American Mid-West. The pronunciation of various place names of French origin is truly bizarre.

Get a bit of education, George and Carl, will you? The French and the Germans have been trading the same spaces for centuries, and have severe problems pronouncing the names of many of those towns correctly. So. . .they gave up the struggle and spell them in their own ways. Koln/Cologne, for just one.
( From first page in Google search "Cologne, Germany" > Cologne Germany Travel Essentials - Cologne Profile
Essential travel information for tourists visiting Cologne, Germany (Koln). Cologne airports,)
I won't blame the stubbornness on either area or nationality or language. http://tinyurl.com/64c53d
(http://maps.google.com/maps?hl=en&fkt=3375&fsdt=1089 1&q=Cologne%2C%20Germany&um=1&ie=UTF-8&sa=N&
amp;tab=wl)
Map of Germany. Nemmind that Belgium is either Belge or Belgique. Look at Switzerland. And don't tell me they are variant spellings of identical correct pronunciations. They reflect the usage of people of different nations. It is very doubtful that any word in one language is always pronounced correctly in a foreign tongue.
We in Wisconsin have spellings and pronunciations of words in which the actual meaning, in French or some indigenous language, has been corrupted and lost to other than speculation.
Isn't that true of New England towns? Pacific Coastal area?
Both of these pronounciations are wrong, IMHO! :-D I've ... but, blessum, they can do lots of other things! :-D

"macabre" is an English word. It was stolen from French, but when it is used by English speakers it is English. Both those pronunciation are correct for the English word "macabre".

Many Englishmen also struggle with 'macabre' but *I* can ... got it down to a tee, lol! Pierre from Gascony

Phew! I was expecting to find that the American pronunciation was 'macarhber' (cf the discussion about 'timbre'). However, I would say that neither of the pronunciations given is correct. The first totally ignores the 're' at the end. The second is pretty close, but maybe the 're' is just a bit too long and too emphasised. Presumably the original French is with a short 'a' in the middle.

Ian
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