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Americans rarely read! Conjecture, yes, but what else could explain this? http://tinyurl.com/8phgm

I'd like to click on the link, but I'm illiterate.

I didn't realize there was no distinction between "don't read" and "can't read."
I'd like to click on the link, but I'm illiterate.

I didn't realize there was no distinction between "don't read" and "can't read."

You see my problem?

SML
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Actually, the "Tribune Company" owns the Los Angeles Times ... or http://www.pbs.org/newshour/bb/media/jan-june00/tribune 3-21.html , where it says, among other things

Times Mirror company's company's marquis property is the Los Angeles Times

Wait, that should be "marquee property", shouldn't it?

More than that, what have/had the Chandlers to do with circuses?
The British, on the other hand, seem to have a big appetite for the tabloids, but still, their more serious newspapers equal the American ones in circulation despite having a muchsmaller population.

So which are the British "serious" newspapers, if not the tabloids like the Times and the Guardian?

Steve Hayes from Tshwane, South Africa
http://www.geocities.com/Athens/7734/stevesig.htm
E-mail - see web page, or parse: shayes at dunelm full stop org full stop uk
Actually, the "Tribune Company" owns the Los Angeles Times ... or http://www.pbs.org/newshour/bb/media/jan-june00/tribune 3-21.html , where it says, among other things

Times Mirror company's company's marquis property is the Los Angeles Times

Wait, that should be "marquee property", shouldn't it?

"Marquis property" doesn't stand up under Marquis of Queensbury rules. It looks like a hypercorrection made by someone who thinks "marquee" is insufficiently Gallic. ("Marquee" comes from "marquise" anyway.)
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Actually, the "Tribune Company" owns the Los Angeles Times ... or http://www.pbs.org/newshour/bb/media/jan-june00/tribune 3-21.html , where it says, among other things

Times Mirror company's company's marquis property is the Los Angeles Times

Wait, that should be "marquee property", shouldn't it?

I copied and pasted. You could write a letter to pbs.org and complain if you don't like the spelling.
I'd never seen or heard "marquis" used that way, but I took their word for it that it meant something like
"outstanding". Now that I try to find it in some
dictionaries, I don't find a relevant definition for either "marquis" or "marquee".
Can anyone say where there is an applicable definition?
Wait, that should be "marquee property", shouldn't it?

I copied and pasted. You could write a letter to pbs.org and complain if you don't like the spelling. I'd ... I don't find a relevant definition for either "marquis" or "marquee". Can anyone say where there is an applicable definition?

I'm not sure. I think the "marquee" here is "a permanent canopy often of metal and glass projecting over an entrance (as of a hotel or theater)". In particular, I think the idea here is a theater marquee that announces a particular performance, show, or film as worthy of public notice.
The British, on the other hand, seem to have a ... the American ones in circulation despite having a muchsmaller population.

So which are the British "serious" newspapers, if not the tabloids like the Times and the Guardian?

The Independent got there first. So what's left now? The Telegraph and the Financial Times?
Alan Jones
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Wait, that should be "marquee property", shouldn't it?

I copied and pasted. You could write a letter to pbs.org and complain if you don't like the spelling. I'd ... I don't find a relevant definition for either "marquis" or "marquee". Can anyone say where there is an applicable definition?

MWCD11:
having or associated with the name recognition and attraction of one whose name appears on a marquee : BIG-NAME, STAR
OED sense 4 (online edition, draft entry Dec. 2000): designating a celebrity, star attraction, etc., whose name appears or is worthy to appear in the billing of a film, show, etc., or (allusively) who has achieved great fame and popularity
Encarta : having public appeal or considered in connection with public appeal
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