1 « 7 8  10 11 » 49
The 1841-1902 issues of real Brooklyn Eagle are on-line, courtesy of the Brooklyn Public Library, at .

Ah. A new resource. That can push "duck tape" (in the non-sticky sense) back to 1902:
Considering that it requires nine tons of cable compound at 20 cents a pound, and that 100,000 yards of cotton duck tape must be wrapped around the cable with neatness and exactitude, it may be imagined that this method of cable preservation is quite expensive, costing fully as much as a wire wrapping. (11/21/1902)

(talking of the East River Bridge)

Evan Kirshenbaum + HP Laboratories >It is one thing to be mistaken; it is
1501 Page Mill Road, 1U, MS 1141 >quite another to be willfullyPalo Alto, CA 94304 >ignorant

(650)857-7572
http://www.kirshenbaum.net /
The 1841-1902 issues of real Brooklyn Eagle are on-line, courtesy of the Brooklyn Public Library, at .

Ah. A new resource. That can push "duck tape" (in the non-sticky sense) back to 1902: Considering that it requires ... cable preservation is quite expensive, costing fully as much as a wire wrapping. (11/21/1902) (talking of the East River Bridge)

The *wha'*? Aha something I didn't know: the Brooklyn Bridge (opened in 1883) was formerly also known as "the East River Bridge" or "the Great East River Bridge". The Brooklyn Bridge is in fact the older name, but the other names were used during 1883-1903 as well.

Other East River bridges include the Williamsburg(h) Bridge (opened in
1903), the Manhattan Bridge (1908), and the Queensboro (sic) Bridge(1912).
Thanks, Erk!
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
The London Times, Die Welt, Le Figaro, Dagens Nyheter, those are national papers with an even(ish) readership distribution across their respective countries.

Surely readership of the London Times is concentrated in the London metropolitan area (= BrE "conurbation"?)

=BrE "the London area"
as a matter of course.

Bollocks. Unless you're relying on the fact that the UK population is concentrated in the London area.
Readership of the Grauniad seems to be concentrated in Oxford and Madrid, not counting the Warrington Grauniad , which is concentrated in Warrington and some part of France.

Your sampling technique needs some work.

Mike Barnes
Cheshire, England
They are not national newspapers, they are Washington and New-York ... papers with an even(ish) readership distribution across their respective countries.

I agree that they are non-national, as I said. I wonder whether your implied definition or criterion for nationalness is ... Oxford and Madrid, not counting the Warrington Grauniad , which is concentrated in Warrington and some part of France.

So what does the sort of person who in London would read the Times read if they live in the south-west, or the midlands or northern England? I'd think they still read the Times. Newspaper readership in England is more a matter of social class than geography, though it's even a little more complex than that.
I'm a Guardian reader, but in the part of London where I live there's usually just one or two copies of the Guardian in the newsagents - you have to get out quick if you want to be sure of buying them. Two miles up the raod in another London suburb, there's a huge pile of Guardians in newsagents.
Matthew Huntbach
They are not national newspapers, they are Washington and New-York ... papers with an even(ish) readership distribution across their respective countries.

I agree that they are non-national, as I said. I wonder whether your implied definition or criterion for nationalness is valid, however. Surely readership of the London Times is concentrated in the London metropolitan area (= BrE "conurbation"?) as a matter of course.

No, no and no again. "The Times" is a national newspaper (at least in England and Wales). It's printed in various centres around the country and read by the sort of people who read The Times, no matter where they live.
Readership of the Grauniad seems to be concentrated in Oxford and Madrid,

Hey, I'm going to Madrid in early July. My first time there.

The Guardian is read all over the country by the sort of people who read The Guardian. And so on.
not counting the Warrington Grauniad , which is concentrated in Warrington and some part of France.

The Warrington Guardian has no relationship with The Guardian - "guardian" is just a popular name for a newspaper. Because of that, the Warrington paper is not characterised as "Grauniad". They may have naff local stories (chip pan fire in woman's house - ceiling slightly scorched) but they do seem to be able to spell.

David
==
replace usenet with the
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
Hey, I'm going to Madrid in early July. My first time there.

Take lots of deodorant and loose-fitting clobber, because it'll be a bit on the warm side. (Shorts are probably not a good idea, though.)

I'll be interested to hear whether the centre reminds you of Manchester in some (good) ways. It does me, a lot, and I've never quite been able to figure out why. But every time I walk up the Calle Atocha, which runs from the station of that name at the bottom of the Castellana (the main drag, where the Prado is, with the Bernabeu Stadium at the top end) up to the old bit around the Plaza Mayor, I find myself expecting to see Shudehill off to left or the Strangeways tower in the distance. It's not really the architecture so much as... I don't know what, but let me know if it strikes you the same way.

Decent food and booze is assured, anyway. (No need to tip for just drinks.)

Ross Howard
Hey, I'm going to Madrid in early July. My first time there.

Take lots of deodorant and loose-fitting clobber, because it'll be a bit on the warm side. (Shorts are probably not a good idea, though.)

OK. Why not shorts? I mean for sightseeing and wandering around?
I'll be interested to hear whether the centre reminds you of Manchester in some (good) ways. It does me, a ... the architecture so much as... I don't know what, but let me know if it strikes you the same way.

I will take a good look around.
Decent food and booze is assured, anyway. (No need to tip for just drinks.)

I suspect I may be heavily managed by my hosts, so I'm probably not going to pay for anything after the first afternoon and evening, which I have deliberately left free so I can please myself.

David
==
replace usenet with the
OK. Why not shorts? I mean for sightseeing and wandering around?[/nq]Sorry, that was just a Per-oriented joke. No, wear whatever you like it's a cosmopolitan, modern European city. The only places in Spain where shorts are not a good idea are many of the Church-related sites. I have heard that they only let men into cathedrals if they're in longs. But since Madrid proper is Church-related-site-free the Escorial monastery is some way out of town that won't be a problem. Actually, apart from art the Prado, the Reina Sofia Centre and the Thyssen museum Madrid is a strangely sight-free place.

The Palacio Real and Pardo (not a typo) Palace (Franco's old gaff) are so dull I don't even know if they're open to the public. There is a wax museum, but it's not a patch on Tussaud's, and, er, that's it. Nevertheless, it's still a city that most people enjoy, with hundreds of pavemnet terraces from which to watch el mundo go by.

Ross Howard
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Looking at some of the 78,900,000 Google hits on "Times newspaper", I wonder if it would be easier to count the cities that don't have a "Times" than the ones that do.

I was referring to the places where The Times (published in London) is printed. This was intended to counter the suggestion that said paper is a London regional paper.

Peter Duncanson
UK (posting from a.u.e)
Show more