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Look at the following sentences :

He was busy. (Positive statement)

He wasn't busy. (Negative statement)

Was he busy. (Positive question)

Wasn't he busy. (Negative question)

Now, Look at the following sentence.

I am a monkey. (Positive statement)

I am not a monkey. (Negative statement)

Am I a monkey. (Positive Question)

Amn't a monkey. (Negative Question). I think this sentence is wrong..

Can we use Amn't to make negative question.

Could you explain me?
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user_english

Look at the following sentences :

He was busy. (Positive statement)

He wasn't busy. (Negative statement)

Was he busy. (Positive question)

Wasn't he busy. (Negative question)

Now, Look at the following sentence.

I am a monkey. (Positive statement)

I am not a monkey. (Negative statement)

Am I a monkey. (Positive Question)

Amn't a monkey. (Negative Question). I think this sentence is wrong..

Can we use Amn't to make negative question.

Could you explain me?

"Amn't" doesn't exist in English. "Am I not a monkey" or "Aren't I a monkey". Just one of those little irregularities.
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Ok, thanks

Can we use :

Was he not busy? instead of wasn't he busy? to make negative questions.

Also,

Could you explain me the sentence (Aren't I a monkey?)

If we able to say (Aren't I a monkey?) then I think, we can say

I are a monkey.

But this sentence seems absurd to me.

Could you explain me what's that all about?
user_englishOk, thanks

Can we use :

Was he not busy? instead of wasn't he busy? to make negative questions.both are fine

Also,

Could you explain me the sentence (Aren't I a monkey?) Grammatically, it is correct....an irregular form

If we able to say (Aren't I a monkey?) then I think, we can say

I are a monkey. I am a monkey.

But this sentence seems absurd to me.

Could you explain me what's that all about?

As I said before, it's an irregular form....the entire verb 'to be' is totally irregular in past and present [am, are, is / were, was bear absolutely no similarity to the infinitive 'be'.] Accept it, don't try to analyze it....just get on to learning more English. Emotion: big smile
I can assure you that "amn't I" does exist, and it is used all the time in a few English dialects. It is not incorrect; in fact, it's a rational and justifiable choice. "Aren't I" seems irrational to me, in purely logical terms; if I were to say "I are", I would be regarded as being in the wrong.

Compare: I am, am I not? I am, amn't I?; I are, are I not? I are, aren't I?

Even Chrome's built-in spelling checker objects to my usage of the term "amn't" by underlining the word with an ugly red squiggle. I'd never object to usage of "aren't I", but I weary of being corrected when I use what I consider to be the rational form.

Rather than "aren't I" being absolutely "correct", in my opinion it's accepted because of its extensive usage (apart from in Ireland and Scotland). I wonder when and where this deviation first occurred.

It may have something to do with the fact that the verb "to be" is the only verb in English where the second person singular conjugal stem (you are) differs from that of the first person singular (I am), as far as I can see. I was unable to think of a single exception. Compare: I go, you go, etc.
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