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... is there any difference between the two?

Thanks,
Adam
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I think "amongst" is simply the "old version" of among.
More a matter of individual choice, Adam. There is no difference.
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From "http://www.bartleby.com/68/49/349.html ":

These two prepositions are interchangeable in meaning, but among is far more frequent in American English; for some, amongst has a rather dusty-genteel quality. It occurs far more often in British English.

(1) The Oxford English Dictionary observes that among is often followed by a singular collective noun, especially if the noun is the name of a substance: among the straw; some lean among the fat. Plural objects of the preposition are of course very common: among the dozens of people; among the causes.

(2) Although among does occur occasionally with each other and one another, the far more usual (and better) choice is a plural -self pronoun: They agreed among [amongst] themselves; or, use with and each other, as in They agreed with each other.
Yes, the difference has to do with usage: amongst is older. Another example is: while and whilst.

Keep in touch!
Thank you all!

Adam
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my friend finds the word amongst realy amusing , why?
Hi,

Surely this is a question you should ask your friend? I don't even know him or her.

Best wishes, Clive
SeyfihocaThese two prepositions are interchangeable in meaning, but among is far more frequent in American English; for some, amongst has a rather dusty-genteel quality. It occurs far more often in British English.

confirmed by Garner, Modern American Usage, p. 42
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