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I try to foster an appreciation for classical music in my students.

I try to create an awareness for classical music in my students.

I hope both of the above are fine by you. On top of that, I believe they render similar meanings too.

If you are a teacher, would you write 'among my students' or 'in my students' ?

You could take another simple example here.

I try to create an awareness for AIDS sufferers of our country in my /among my students.

What do you think?
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Comments  
Well, I think bith are okay, but when you use among, somehow you build up a connection between the objects, the people you mention, like an emotion. I think!
Hello Andrei

1. I try to foster an appreciation for classical music in my students.
> 'an appreciation of'

2. I try to create an awareness for classical music in my students.
> 'awareness of'

#1 implies knowledge of greater depth than #2; also enjoyment of the music.

3. 'Among my students, there are three Germans and a Lithuanian.'

4. 'I try to create an awareness for AIDS sufferers in our country in my students.'
- you are creating the awareness IN each student.

5. 'I try to create an awareness for AIDS sufferers in our country among my students.'
- you are creating the awareness in the group as a whole.

MrP
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I'd say "in":

... foster an appreciation for classical music in my students.

But I'd say "among" for something like this:

... foster camaraderie among my students. (each to all the others)

CJ
Though CalifJim has not mentioned, I would agree with MrPedantic to use the words 'aprreciation of'. I looked it up in a dictionary.
For some reason, "appreciation for" didn't bother me, probably by analogy with expressions such as "to show appreciation for (kindness done, etc.)", "to thank for", "to show disgust for". I concede that "of" is probably the more recommended choice among usage panels and the like. Emotion: smile
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Hello

'Appreciation' is a noun derived from the verb 'appreciate', and according to a traditional linguistic theory, a VP [V+DO] is usually nominalized into a NP in the form of [N+of+DO] where N is a noun derived from V. So the nominalized form of 'appreciate something' should be 'appreciation of something' according to the theory. But note it is merely a linguistic theory, and all the English speakers do not need to be linguists. Therefore I think 'appreciation for something' is also OK.

paco
Interesting and thorny topic, that! "usually" is the keyword.

It appears to me that "for" is the only really common alternative to "of" in these constructions, with an occasional "to" or "with" or some other preposition. And it always depends on the verb, of course. Some take only "of"; some take "of" or "for". But do any take only "for"?

He needs love. > his need [?of / for] love
He desires wealth. > his desire [?of / for] wealth
He craves sweets. > his cravings [?of / for] sweets
He rewarded our good behavior. > his reward [?of / for] our good behavior
He praised our good behavior. > his praise [of / for] our good behavior
?He punished our bad behavior. > his punishment [?of / ?for] our bad behavior
He hunted lions in Africa. > his hunting [of / ?for] lions in Africa
He supports the candidate. > his support [of / for] the candidate
He loves his wife. > his love [?of / for / ?toward] his wife
He reveres the truth. > his reverence [?of / for] the truth
He disdains the rich. > his disdain [of / for] the rich
He admires linguists. > his admiration [?of / ?for] linguists
He hates hypocrites. > his hatred [of / ?for / ?toward] hypocrites
He tapped the table. > his tapping [?of / on] the table
He swatted the fly. > his swatting [of / at] the fly
He attempted the jump. > his attempt [?of / at] the jump
He met Sally. > his meeting [of / with] Sally
He visited Sally. > his visit [?of / with] Sally
He married Susan. > his marriage [?of / *for / ?with / to] Susan
He divorced Susan. > his divorce [?of / *for / from] Susan
He trusts Bill. > his trust [?of / ?for / in] Bill

Emotion: smile
Hello Jim
He needs love. > his need [?of / for] love
The verb 'need' didn't come from the noun 'need'. The relation is reverse.
The verb 'need' was brought forth from the verb 'need' in the 12th century.
He desires wealth. > his desire [?of / for] wealth
Historically 'desire of' has been more common than 'desire for'. "His predominant passion was desire of money" (Johnson: 1759).
Even now "desire of" is used as often as "desire for". Google hit number for "desire for the" is 355,000 and that for "desire of the" is 459,000.
He craves sweets. > his cravings [?of / for] sweets
The NP 'cravings for something' came from the VP (intransitive) "crave for something".
He craved for sweets --> his cravings for sweets.
He rewarded our good behavior. > his reward [?of / for] our good behavior
He rewarded us for our good behavior. > his reward [?of / for] our good behavior
He praised our good behavior. > his praise [of / for] our good behavior
He praised us for our good behavior. > his praise for our good behavior
?He punished our bad behavior. > his punishment [?of / ?for] our bad behavior
Punishment of undesired behavior soon led to escape activity in the dog. (L.M. Baker 1960).
Google hits: 271,000 for "punishment of the" and 198,000 for "punishment for the".
He hunted lions in Africa. > his hunting [of / ?for] lions in Africa


He supports the candidate. > his support [of / for] the candidate
Google hits: 1,430,000 for "support of the" and 1,520,000 for "support for the".
I feel a stronger support in 'support of' than in 'support for'. Am I right?
He loves his wife. > his love [?of / for / ?toward] his wife

The use of the noun 'love' is very complicated.
I think the noun 'love' is originally of a passive sense:
(Ex) the love of God for someone or the love of the mother (this 'of' would be 'off'/'from').
But you would say "my love of music" when you love music.
Also I have to admit I don't know which one came first, the noun 'love' or the verb 'love'.
He reveres the truth. > his reverence [?of / for] the truth


He reveres for the truth. > his reverence [?of / for] the truth.
'Reverence of something' was a very common phrase until 17th century. "It is good to feast the Saturday for the love of our lady and in the reverence of her virginity"(1450)
He disdains the rich. > his disdain [of / for] the rich
Now 'one's disdain for' is somewhat more popular but 'one's disdain of' was more common until recently.
"Haughtiness is founded on the high opinion we entertain of ourselves; disdain, on the low opinion we have of others."( L. Murray 1824)
He admires linguists. > his admiration [?of / ?for] linguists
Now 'one's admiration for' is more popular than 'one's admiration of' but 'in admiration of' is an idiomatic phrase.
He hates hypocrites. > his hatred [of / ?for / ?toward] hypocrites.


He tapped the table. > his tapping [?of / on] the table
He tapped on the table. > his tapping on the table
He swatted the fly. > his swatting [of / at] the fly


He attempted the jump. > his attempt [?of / at] the jump
I think theoretically the NP 'attempt at' should be 'attempt on' but it seems now obsolete.
He met Sally. > his meeting [of / with] Sally
He met with Sally. > his meeting [of / with] Sally
He visited Sally. > his visit [?of / with] Sally
He visited India > his visit of India
He married Susan. > his marriage [?of / *for / ?with / to] Susan
She is married to Jim. > her marriage [to] Jim.
He divorced Susan. > his divorce [?of / *for / from] Susan.
She was divorced from Jim. > her divorce from Jim.
He trusts Bill. > his trust [?of / ?for / in] Bill
He trusts in Bill. > his trust in Bill.

paco
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