Does anyone have any comments about this?
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Does anyone have any comments about this?

Interesting, though the author doesn't seem to know the meaning of the word "cliche". Also, I'm surprised that he doubts that there's much anglophilia in the US these days.
Adrian

Well, I've long thought it interesting how fiercely Americans have resisted adding any British-sounding words or phrases. Heavy scorn and mockery are the usual enforcement tools, and in the school playground I do believe a person could get beaten up for sounding la-di-dah.

Whereas I gather (and this is mere personal observation) that the British have few qualms about throwing in the occasional Americanism almost exactly the way a standard US speaker might throw in a charming Southernism, hillbilly word, or bit of cowboy lingo.

My theory is that when Group A feels superior to Group B, they can borrow the language whenever they like. When Group B feels not necessarily inferior, but defensive about its status and rights, then it puts up a one-way barrier. That preserves its identity.

I think a similar pattern could be found between other groups. Probably schoolchildren in the UK insist that others speak the proper way, although in some cases that might mean posh and other times, not posh.

You can find records from the 19th century and probably earlier of Americans defending their right to speak English their own way. I think that's where our tradition of not sounding too British comes from.

Look at that article it's reasonably neutral most of the way, reporting about changes in the language, and then, whammo, at the end:

Briticisms all: Together they constitute a cultural equivalent of De Vries's poseur.
I'm afraid I can't resist the inevitable conclusion, so here goes: Briticisms have passed their sell-by date, and the odor (or should I say odour) is
getting a bit rank.
So although the writer hardly gives any reasons why Americans should resist Briticisms (I don't find "we don't need them" too compelling), he ends by suddenly saying they are phoney and foul. Where'd that come from?
(By the way, careful research on some of those might show they've long been on the US scene. We talked about "to move house" here before, and I was the tiny minority who said it was, too, used in the US, for a long time. However, let's please not get into houses that move, again.)

Best Donna Richoux
An American living in the Netherlands
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Donna Richoux filted:
(By the way, careful research on some of those might show they've long been on the US scene. We talked ... was, too, used in the US, for a long time. However, let's please not get into houses that move, again.)

Agreed...the one that jumped out at me as being thoroughly Americanized was "one-off"...we've been saying that in these parts for decades...I've even heard "one-offer" as the corresponding noun, circa 1980..r
Does anyone have any comments about this?

Interesting, though the author doesn't seem to know the meaning of theword "cliche". Also, I'm surprised that he doubts that there's much anglophilia in the US these days.

btw, here's one Briticism I can't see catching on otherpondwise: http://icbirmingham.icnetwork.co.uk/eveningmail/news/page.cfm?objectid=14359309&method=full&sitei...

btwbtw, I think he should've stuck to his guns and retained the item on the site.
Adrian
Adrian Bailey typed thus:

Quite. Although there is a book:

David
==
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Well, I've long thought it interesting how fiercely Americans have resisted adding any British-sounding words or phrases. Heavy scorn and ... goes: Briticisms have passed their sell-by date, and the odor (or should I say odour) is getting a bit rank.

Ben! Ben! You awake there Ben?
Wassup man?
I'm cutting ya last 12000 woids. Our readers don't care squat what an 'eggcup' is. Write me a snappy last sentence.
Sure man, pass me that envelope...
DC
Adrian Bailey typed thus:

word anglophilia btw, here's one Briticism I can't see catching ... to his guns and retained the item on the site.

Quite. Although there is a book:

I've got a pack in the fridge right now. Scrummy.

DC
(Email Removed):
Whereas I gather (and this is mere personal observation) that the British have few qualms about throwing in the occasional Americanism almost exactly the way a standard US speaker might throw in a charming Southernism, hillbilly word, or bit of cowboy lingo.

'Aluminum' or 'sidewalk' never fail to get a reaction from anyone I'm talking to.
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