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Hi,

If I say "It's just an accident!" and someone replies "Accident by a s s h o l e!", does that mean that the speaker responds in an impoite manner or is it used between very close friends. My question is if the underlined part is right.(I saw it in a movie's subtitle).

I just want to grasb the correct usage of this colloquial expression, so please give me another example, if you have..

Thanks!!!
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Hi,

If I say "It's just an accident!" and someone replies "Accident by a s s h o l e!", the word is 'my', not 'by'.

does that mean that the speaker responds in an impolite manner Yes
or is it used between very close friends. If they both want to talk that way

My question is if the underlined part is right.(I saw it in a movie's subtitle).

I just want to grasb the correct usage of this colloquial expression, so please give me another example, if you have..

Many people, including me, find this expression ugly and offensive. I prefer not to discuss it on the Forum.

Clive
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yanxI just want to grasb the correct usage of this colloquial expression, so please give me another example, if you have..
It is an extremely crude, insulting, and rude expression. We try to keep discussions on EnglishForward out of the linguistic gutter.

However, if you would like synonyms (there are many) for this expression and learn vulgar street language, there is a dictionary just for this purpose. Use this link < UrbanDictionary . >
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Comments  
yanxI just want to grasp the correct usage of this colloquial expression
This expression is a vulgar expression of anger and a refusal to believe that what happened was an accident.

There is no "correct usage" except never to use it. Some people will drop you as a friend if they hear you say this.

Even the watered-down version "Accident, my foot!" shows anger in a rude way and should also be avoided.

CJ
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Thanks for all your help.