1. A registered nurse
2. An un-registered nurse

I know the 'un-registered' in the second example is a wrong word, but am looking for the opposite of 'register'. A nurse can be 'un- registered' for various reasons, such as failing continuous education, making a medication mistake, negligence, etc.
An analogy is validate vs. invalidate.
Thanks for teaching.
1 2
1. A registered nurse 2. An un-registered nurse I know the 'un-registered' in the second example is a wrong word, ... such as failing continuous education, making a medication mistake, negligence, etc. An analogy is validate vs. invalidate. Thanks for teaching.

If they're not licensed, registered, or certified they are no longer nurses. Although, perhaps in a more general sense, such as "she nursed him back to health"..

** DAVE HATUNEN (Email Removed) ** * Tucson Arizona, out where the cacti grow * * My typos & mispellings are intentional copyright traps *
1. A registered nurse 2. An un-registered nurse I know the 'un-registered' in the second example is a wrong word, ... such as failing continuous education, making a medication mistake, negligence, etc. An analogy is validate vs. invalidate. Thanks for teaching.

You seem to be looking for a word that describes a nurse that was a RN (registered nurse), but has been sanctioned for some reason. In that case, she would be "unlicensed". RNs are licensed by the state. Their entry as licensed is what registers them. They can also become unlicensed if they fail to renew their license.
The above pertains to the US. I have no idea of the rules elseplace.

Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
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1. A registered nurse 2. An un-registered nurse I know ... etc. An analogy is validate vs. invalidate. Thanks for teaching.

You seem to be looking for a word that describes a nurse that was a RN (registered nurse), but has ... they fail to renew their license. The above pertains to the US. I have no idea of the rules elseplace.

In the UK the action of removing a nurse from the register for bad conduct or breach of the rules is called "striking off".

This is a news release from the Nursing & Midwifery Council (NMC) http://www.nmc-uk.org/aArticle.aspx?ArticleID=3668

Nurse struck off register for confidentiality breach

The NMC has legal responsibility for registering nurses in the UK.

In Australia and New Zealand "de-registration" seems to be the term used.

Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.english.usage)
1. A registered nurse 2. An un-registered nurse I know the 'un-registered' in the second example is a wrong word, ... A nurse can be 'un- registered' for various reasons, such as failing continuous education, making a medication mistake, negligence, etc.

As Peter Duncanson has posted, the action of forcibly de-registering a nurse is to "strike off".
I asked my wife, who is a registered nurse, what term she would use to describe an un-registered/de-registered/no-longer-registered ex- colleague; she knows of no specific term for it other than "a struck-off nurse".

Cheers, Harvey
CanEng and BrEng, indiscriminately mixed
On 07 Oct 2009, dalei-3665 wrote

1. A registered nurse 2. An un-registered nurse I know ... as failing continuous education, making a medication mistake, negligence, etc.

As Peter Duncanson has posted, the action of forcibly de-registering a nurse is to "strike off". I asked my wife, ... use to describe an un-registered/de-registered/no-longer-registered ex- colleague; she knows of no specific term for it other than "a struck-off nurse".

That seems reasonable.

http://www.opsi.gov.uk/si/si2002/20020253.htm#27
29. - (5)...the Committee shall -
(a) make an order directing the Registrar to strike the person concerned off the register (a "striking-off order");

(b) make an order directing the Registrar to suspend the registration of the person concerned for a specified period which shall not exceed one year (a "suspension order");
(c) make an order imposing conditions with which the person concerned must comply for a specified period which shall not exceed three years (a "conditions of practice order"); or

(d) caution the person concerned and make an order directing the Registrar to annotate the register accordingly for a specified period which shall be not less than one year and not more than five years (a "caution order").

Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.english.usage)
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
On 07 Oct 2009, dalei-3665 wrote

1. A registered nurse 2. An un-registered nurse I know ... as failing continuous education, making a medication mistake, negligence, etc.

As Peter Duncanson has posted, the action of forcibly de-registering a nurse is to "strike off". I asked my wife, ... use to describe an un-registered/de-registered/no-longer-registered ex- colleague; she knows of no specific term for it other than "a struck-off nurse".

That's the UK and possibly Canada. We don't use the term "struck off" in the US. Reports here would just say she lost her license.

My wife - also a nurse - overlooked renewing her license one year. (She has to renew every two years) Her employer caught it about a week after her license expired. We had to drive to Tallahassee to renew. She was not allowed to work the few days she was unlicensed.

Now that she is retired, she will file as inactive. This means she is not required to take continuing education courses or renew her license.

Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
1. A registered nurse 2. An un-registered nurse I know the 'un-registered' in the second example is a wrong word, ... such as failing continuous education, making a medication mistake, negligence, etc. An analogy is validate vs. invalidate. Thanks for teaching.

Deregistered? Ex-registered nurse. Once registered nurse. Once a registered nurse. No longer a registered nurse. Disbarred nurse

How about an LPN, a liquid petroleum nurse.

Posters should say where they live, and for which
area they are asking questions. I have lived in
Western Pa. 10 years
Indianapolis 10 years
Chicago 6 years
Brooklyn, NY 12 years
Baltimore 26 years
On 07 Oct 2009, dalei-3665 wrote As Peter Duncanson has ... no specific term for it other than "a struck-off nurse".

That's the UK and possibly Canada. We don't use the term "struck off" in the US.

Yes, I realised after I posted the comment that I should have restricted it geographically. Sorry 'bout that.
Reports here would just say she lost her license. My wife - also a nurse - overlooked renewing her license ... she will file as inactive. This means she is not required to take continuing education courses or renew her license.

Cheers, Harvey
CanEng and BrEng, indiscriminately mixed
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