I hate it when a film set in a specific period uses anachronistic expressions in dialogue.
I was watching something recently (can't remember what) but set in the past, maybe around the 1890s or the early 1900s and a character used the expression "serial killer" and that struck me as just wrong. I looked it up and apparently it was coined in the 1970s.
I've been watching The Red Baron off and on (how it got on my computer I'll never know) and a character tells Manfred that a certain girl "has the hots" for him.
It's an English language version of a (sadly not very good) German film, so I suppose you could argue that this is conveying the sense of what was said in German, but still, it jumps out as Not Of Its Time. Oh, well. the flying sequences are good.
Does seem to me that if it draws attention to itself it pulls you out of the story.

I love words.
- Susannah McCorkle
1 2
I hate it when a film set in a specific period uses anachronistic expressions in dialogue. I was watching something ... are good. Does seem to me that if it draws attention to itself it pulls you out of the story.

Oh, and now she's wearing pajamas that look like they came from Victoria's Secret.
They went to all that trouible to get the planes and the uniforms right, but presumably thought they had to dumb down the love interest and make the lovers look and sound like today's yoof. Idiots.

I love words.
- Susannah McCorkle
I hate it when a film set in a specific period uses anachronistic expressions in dialogue. I was watching something ... are good. Does seem to me that if it draws attention to itself it pulls you out of the story.

"The Patriot" with Mel Gibson
Set in 1776. He asks a lady if she minds if he sits beside her, on a bench. Her response:
"Why not it's a free country or it will be."

There was a lot of really shitty dialogue in that movie, but the above example just took you right out of it.
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
I mean, the only cereals they had back then were Oatmeal and Cream Of Wheat!
I hate it when a film set in a specific period uses anachronistic expressions in dialogue. I was watching something ... and that struck me as just wrong. I looked it up and apparently it was coined in the 1970s.

Yes, I've noticed that also in many modern movies. It's either bad writing, or a bit of improvised acting.

Isn't this what a director is for? To catch these anomalies? Or is it producer over riding certain concerns the director may have?
I watched an interview with Betty Davis, and she said that she wasn't smart
enough to improvise acting, that she needed a script, because improvising
means you are yourself and not the character.
I hate it when a film set in a specific period uses anachronistic expressions in dialogue. I was watching something ... on my computer I'll never know) and a character tells Manfred that a certain girl "has the hots" for him.

I still haven't seen it. What baffles me is why they made the damn thing in English in the first place? As if that's somehow going to make it more palatable for Americans audiences?
Is it at least better than FLYBOYS?
Cheers,
B
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
I agree that single or infrequent instances are horrible, but I don't mind it when an entire film is written that way, if it's done stylishly; the example that comes to mind is A Knight's Tale, where there's almost no concession at all to period dialogue (and the crowds at the jousting tournament enthusiastically clap along to We Will Rock You).

There's a current BBC TV series about the youthful days of King Arthur and Merlin which takes the same approach. It's been much derided over here, and in truth the scripts are a bit variable, but I rather like it. There was a lovely moment in the first episode that laid down the style beautifully, when a rather pretty black girl turned up at Camelot and said "Hi! My name's Guinevere, but you can call me Gwen"...
Improvisation, on the other hand, is a foul practice and should be completely stamped out.
Bert
I've been watching The Red Baron off and on (how ... Manfred that a certain girl "has the hots" for him.

I still haven't seen it. What baffles me is why they made the damn thing in English in the first place? As if that's somehow going to make it more palatable for Americans audiences? Is it at least better than FLYBOYS?

No idea. The writing and the acing is weak, but the flying sequences are pretty good, though you are very aware of the CGI.

I love words.
- Susannah McCorkle
I agree that single or infrequent instances are horrible, but I don't mind it when an entire film is written ... at all to period dialogue (and the crowds at the jousting tournament enthusiastically clap along to We Will Rock You).

Agree.
There's a current BBC TV series about the youthful days of King Arthur and Merlin which takes the same approach. ... you can call me Gwen"... Improvisation, on the other hand, is a foul practice and should be completely stamped out.

And I'm sure it will be, now that Obama is president.

I love words.
- Susannah McCorkle
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Show more