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a. George hadn't heard about the movie.

b. George didn't hear about the movie.

c. George had eaten a bowl of icecream.

d. George ate a bowel of icecream.

Is this the correct analysis of tenses?

The past perfect expresses an indefinite time and expresses that George heard of the movie sometime after that and that George ate the icecream before doing something else, which is not mentioned.



The past simple expresses a definite time and doesn't refer to any other times.

Thank you.
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I don't see that either time is more definite, since none is mentioned in any of the sentences. And the past perfect is invalid without the mention somewhere of that other action.
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Mister MicawberI don't see that either time is more definite, since none is mentioned in any of the sentences

Um, didn't hear is a specific/definite time...It is a specific time in the past, and you could add a time adverbial after it unlike with the past perfect which can't include a time adverbial, can it?. Isn't this right?
Mister MicawberAnd the past perfect is invalid without the mention somewhere of that other action.
Yes, I suppose it could be implied, or at least previously mentioned in, say, dialogue.

Thanks.
Well, then 'didn't hear' and 'hadn't heard' are both specific times in the past (of something that didn't happen!)

Adding a time adverbial:

I didn't hear by noon yesterday (?)
I hadn't heard by noon yesterday(?)

(I don't think we're getting anywhere with this thread now.)