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Coyul you please hep me to under the following piece?

A little learning is a dangerous thing;
Drink deep, or taste not the Pierian spring;
There shallow draughts intoxicate the brain,
And drinking largely sobers us again. -- Alexander Pope


Pierian spring: metaphorical source of knowledge of art and science
Drink deep: drink considerably
sober: not drunk

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The first line tells it all.

I'm reminded of those who are labeled "sophmoric," or "wise fools."

Sometimes we say, "He knows just enough to be dangerous." (Eg, an amateur electrician.)

There's also the dilettante.

Pope suggests that if you're not going to be serious about your intellectual pursuits, just stay out of it.

Dabbling in knowledge makes you giddy. Only when you make a full committment will you attain true strength, balance, and control.
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Jackson6612And drinking largely sobers us again
This is an unusual application of "largely."
When I first read it, I took it as "(After drinking lightly) we are sobered, to a great extent,
by (additional) drinking of/from the Pierian spring." (a bit unsatisfactory)

I now realize it really means "drinking well - drinking heavily." (drinking largely)

This doesn't change the interpretation of the lines. Emotion: shake

I think in modern English, "largely" is used to mean "to a great extent; for the most part; almost fully."

I was largely convinced by his arguments that we had been wrong.
Thanks a lot, Avangi.
AvangiWhen I first read it, I took it as "(After drinking lightly) we are sobered, to a great extent, by (additional) drinking of/from the Pierian spring." (a bit unsatisfactory)
I would have used 'off' instead because 'off' has 'from' as one of its senses. Do I make any sense? I don't really know what you had in mind when you used it but there has to be some reason, right?

Please let me know.
I understand what you mean, but I'd say that usage is unidiomatic, or very low register casual at best.

Don't drink directly off the faucet!

This would be understood, but "from" would be the accepted choice.

My neighbor is tapping power directly off the light pole. In this case, "off" and "from" are equally acceptable. Go figure.

He was eating his food directly off/from the table, without a plate. Here, "off" seems to work better.
(Of course "off the table" has another meaning which is completely different.)

I believe it's the verb that makes the difference. We simply say, "Drink from."
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Which usage is unidiomatic, of "off" or "of"? You used "of".
Jackson6612Which usage is unidiomatic, of "off" or "of"? You used "of".
"Drinking off the Pierian Spring" is unidiomatic, IMHO.