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All of a sudden, the car turned 180 degrees and faced the truck behind it.

Al of a sudden, the car turned 180 degrees, facing the truck behind it.

What is the difference in meaning between these two sentences, or is one incorrect?

Thanks
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Hi,

All of a sudden, the car turned 180 degrees and faced the truck behind it.

Al of a sudden, the car turned 180 degrees, facing the truck behind it.

What is the difference in meaning between these two sentences, or is one incorrect?

Really, you could say it either way. You could say it more precisely, but the reader's mind supplies the details of the manoeuvre.

Best wishes, Clive
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Clive,

To me, the first construction emphasizes turning happens first before facing, though in this context the sequence is already well understood. Here's a better example to support my theory

He walked into the room and pulled a giant cart. <= walking in happens first before pulling. Naturally, the reader may think the cart is in the room

He walked into the room, pulling a giant cart. <= walking and pulling happen together. It sounds like the cart was pulled into the room.

Please correct me.Thanks!
Hi,

Yes, in the context of your new example you are right.Emotion: smile But, as you say, in the original example the sequence is well understood in either case.

All of a sudden, the car turned 180 degrees, facing the truck behind it. Actually, a more natural and clearer way of saying this -ing version is

All of a sudden, the car turned 180 degrees and ended up facing the truck behind it.


Clive