+0
Hello,

Which is the correct way of saying I will reach there at a certain time and you can join me anytime?

I will be there at 10am and you can join me anytime.

I will be there at 10am, you can join me anytime.

I will be there at 10am. You can join me anytime.

Thanks.
+0
I will be there at 10am and you can join me anytime. Some traditionalists, like me, would put a comma after 10 a.m. (Do leave a space between 10 and am.)

I will be there at 10am, you can join me anytime. Not this one. It's a comma splice.

I will be there at 10am. You can join me anytime. This is fine.
Comments  
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Grammar GeekI will be there at 10am and you can join me anytime. Some traditionalists, like me, would put a comma after 10 a.m. (Do leave a space between 10 and am.)

In British English, it is correct to write 10am. (no space and no periods)

I will be there at 10am and you can join me anytime. "I will be there at 10 AM, and you can join me anytime" would be grammatically correct, but it still sounds a bit awkward to me.

I will be there at 10am, you can join me anytime. This is incorrect. However, if you use a semicolon in place of the comma, it could work ("I will be there at 10 AM; you can join me anytime.").

I will be there at 10am. You can join me anytime. This is, in my opinion, the best choice; it looks and sounds good.

As for the whole "10am" debate? The following (as far as I'm aware) are acceptable: A.M., AM, and a.m. Be sure to space.