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Hi,

Question:
Could you please explain the usage of "and" in my sentence.

Sentence:
"The question often arises in the general public: Can we do something about this. And the answer is yes.

My opinion:
The "and" is at the start of a sentence, so it is very special.
According to the following link, I think we can use meaning 9 - (used to introduce a consequence or conditional result):

http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/and

Thanks
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I see nothing particularly consequential or resultative about 'and' there. Being at the beginning of a sentence does not make the meaning of 'and' special; it adds emphasis to the clause or phrase that follows it, and that is all it is doing here. The writer wishes to stress that there is indeed an answer to the question-- a positive answer.
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Hi,

Question:
Could you please explain the usage of "and" in my sentence.

Sentence:
"The question often arises in the general public: Can we do something about this. And the answer is yes.

My opinion:
The "and" is at the start of a sentence, so it is very special.
According to the following link, I think we can use meaning 9 - (used to introduce a consequence or conditional result):

Why would you call the answer to a question a consequence or result?

I just think of it as linking two related utterances.



I've never seen so many meanings of 'and' listed before. But your link vanishes a few seconds after I click on it. Don't know why.

Clive

Clive
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Comments  
Hi,

There are 2 other sentences.
Could you please compare these 2 sentences with the original sentence?

1. The question often arises in the general public: Can we do something about this.
The answer is yes."

2. The question often arises in the general public: "Can we do something about this"
and the answer is yes."

Thanks
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I see no difference. Both set the answer is a short second statement to isolate and therby highlight it. 'And' makes no difference.
Sentence:
"The question often arises in the general public: Can we do something about this. And the answer is yes.

------------------------------------------------------------------

There are 2 other sentences.

Could you please compare these 2 sentences with the original sentence?

1. The question often arises in the general public: Can we do something about this.

The answer is yes."

2. The question often arises in the general public: "Can we do something about this"

and the answer is yes."

A few additional comments.

In all 3 versions, the question needs a question mark, and there are unbalanced quotation marks.

In the last version above, the colon indicates 'a definition of the question will follow this colon'. It's not appropriate to add another clause (and the answer is yes) at the end of the definition.

Clive