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Hi

A schoolteacher (Miss Mayfield) after coming back from hospital went to her pupils' homes just to visit them.

Ethel Rigby was cleaning out her rabbits. Mrs Rigby

had opened the door and said how nice to see Miss

Mayfield, and was she quite better and what a shame it all

was. Nobody could have been friendlier. She said that

Ethel was with the rabbits.

Come through,’ she said.

Does it mean that Mrs Rigby said that it was nice to see Miss M. and that she looked (or felt?) much better? I'm not sure about the part "and was she quite better"?

Does "come through" just mean "come in"? She went to see with Ethel.
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Hi,

A schoolteacher (Miss Mayfield) after coming back from hospital went to her pupils' homes just to visit them.

Ethel Rigby was cleaning out her rabbits. Mrs Rigby

had opened the door and said how nice to see Miss

Mayfield, and was she quite better and what a shame it all

was. Nobody could have been friendlier. She said that

Ethel was with the rabbits.

Come through,’ she said.

Does it mean that Mrs Rigby said that it was nice to see Miss M. Yes

and that she looked (or felt?) much better? I'm not sure about the part "and was she quite better"?

It's a somewhat old-fashioned way of of reporting a question. eg She asked Miss Mayfield if she was quite better.

Does "come through" just mean "come in"? Yes. In more detail, the idea is often 'Come through one room to get into another', eg come through the hall to get to the living-room.

She went to see with <<<< no 'with' Ethel. We aren't told that, but she probably did.

Clive
Comments  
Thanks for your clarifications!