"I have an unreasonably strong aversion to making verbs out of nouns likes 'parent' ... (for example) ... 'Parenting doesn't come naturally to some men'." (I am not sure where to put the period here - another subject)
Should I tell Andy that this example is not verbing a noun, or would some else like to inform him about gerunds?

Good luck and good sailing.
s/v Kerry Deare of Barnegat
http://kerrydeare.tripod.com
1 2 3
In our last episode,
(Email Removed),
the lovely and talented Armond Perretta
broadcast on alt.usage.english:
"I have an unreasonably strong aversion to making verbs out of nouns likes 'parent' ... (for example) ... 'Parenting doesn't ... tell Andy that this example is not verbing a noun, or would some else like to inform him about gerunds?

You can't gerund it unless you verbed it first.

Lars Eighner finger for geek code (Email Removed) http://www.io.com/~eighner / "There's one good kind of writer a dead one." James T. Farrell
Armond Perretta broadcast ...

"I have an unreasonably strong aversion to making verbs out ... or would some else like to inform him about gerunds?

You can't gerund it unless you verbed it first.

In this example, yes. In the general case, no. I read Andy's complaint as being against verbing "parent." I happen to agree that it's somewhat awkward. Yet Andy used the noun form as his example while complaining about verbs, and that's what I'm bitching about.

Good luck and good sailing.
s/v Kerry Deare of Barnegat
http://kerrydeare.tripod.com
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Armond Perretta broadcast ... You can't gerund it unless you verbed it first.

In this example, yes. In the general case, no. I read Andy's complaintas being against verbing "parent." I happen to agree that it's somewhat awkward. Yet Andy used the noun form as his example while complainingabout verbs, and that's what I'm bitching about.

nuttah
Adrian
"I have an unreasonably strong aversion to making verbs out ... or would some else like to inform him about gerunds?

You can't gerund it unless you verbed it first.

'Parent' has been a verb since C17.

John Dean
Oxford
De-frag to reply
Armond Perretta broadcast ... You can't gerund it unless you verbed it first.

In this example, yes. In the general case, no. I read Andy's complaint as being against verbing "parent." I happen to agree that it's somewhat awkward. Yet Andy used the noun form as his example while complaining about verbs, and that's what I'm bitching about.

A gerund is a verbal, and that's what Andy obviously meant, and I think everybody understood the point, so Andy's wording was effective and unexceptionable.
\\P. Schultz
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In this example, yes. In the general case, no. I ... while complaining about verbs, and that's what I'm bitching about.

A gerund is a verbal, and that's what Andy obviously meant, and I think everybody understood the point, so Andy's wording was effective and unexceptionable.

Below are a few definitions selected entirely at random for "gerund." In all cases it is defined as a noun, albeit in several instances as a verbal noun.
That's still a noun, isn't it?
ger·und ( P ) Pronunciation Key (jrnd)
n.

1.. In Latin, a noun derived from a verb and having all case formsexcept the nominative.

2.. In other languages, a verbal noun analogous to the Latin gerund,such as the English form ending in -ing when used as a noun, as in singing in We admired the choir's singing.
(Late Latin gerundium, from alteration (modeled on participium, participle), of Latin gerundum variant of gerendum, neuter gerundive of gerere, to carry on.)
ge·rundi·al (j-rnd-l) adj.
Source: The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition
Copyright © 2000 by Houghton Mifflin Company.
Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
gerund
\Ger"und\, n. (L. gerundium, fr. gerere to bear, carry, perform. See Gest a deed, Jest.) (Lat. Gram.) 1. A kind of verbal noun, having only the four oblique cases of the singular number, and governing cases like a participle.
2. (AS. Gram.) A verbal noun ending in -e, preceded by to and usuallydenoting purpose or end; called also the dative infinitive; as, ``Ic h(ae)bbe mete t(^o) etanne'' (I have meat to eat.) In Modern English the name has been applied to verbal or participal nouns in -ing denoting a transitive action; e. g., by throwing a stone.
Source: Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary, © 1996, 1998 MICRA, Inc.
gerund
n : a noun formed from a verb (such as the `-ing' form of an English verb when used as a noun)

Good luck and good sailing.
s/v Kerry Deare of Barnegat
http://kerrydeare.tripod.com
>
But not continuously, in these parts.
Does the OED have a way of recording when a word has periods of use and un-use?
Richard Maurer To reply, remove half
Sunnyvale, California of a homonym of a synonym for also.
Armond quoted:
ger·und ( P ) Pronunciation Key (jrnd) n. 1.. In Latin, a noun derived from a verb and having all case forms except the nominative.

But in the singular only.
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