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Do these all work?
1. It makes me angry when you don't try your hardest.
2. It makes me angry to see you not try your hardest.
3. It makes me angry to see that you don't try your hardest.
4. Any other better ones?
Thank you.
1 2
Comments  
They all work. The second is the least usual of the group.

Nothing better than these comes to mind.

CJ
Hello CJ

Could you help me clear my doubt?

#1 "It makes me angry when you don't try your hardest."
You said this sentence works.
But if we take the subject "it" as a provisional "it", we can change it like:
"When you don't try your hardest makes me angry."
To me, this sounds ungrammatical and makes no sense.
I wounder if we should change "when" in #1 to "that".

paco
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Re: #1 "It makes me angry when you don't try your hardest."

There are TWO verbs in this sentence which means that there TWO clauses:-

i) It makes me angry-----main clause
ii) when you don't try your hardest-----adverbial clause modifying the adjective "angry"

The sentence can be re-written like this:-

"When you don't try your hardest, it makes me angry."

You can't omit the "it" (provisional "it" or not)because there would be no subject for the main clause. e.g.

"When you don't try your hardest makes me angry." ???
Hi Paco,

I think that if you replaced "when" with "that" in #1 than it would change the meaning, i.e. it would mean that he always doesn't try his hardest.
And I think you could say:
Tha fact that you don't try your hardest (is what) makes me angry. (with the meaning as above)
Hello guys,

I have long believed the provisionary subject "it" could stand only for a that-clause but now I understand it can stand also for a when-cluase.
(EX) Does it matter when I leave here?
I'd like to take this when-cluase as a noun clause rather than an adverbial clause, though. Anyway, millions thanks for your replies.

paco
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...It makes me angry to see you not try your hardest...

This sounds quite unusual to me too.

Cf.

1. I like to see you try your hardest.

And:

2. I like to see you trying your hardest.

I find #2 much more congenial. Perhaps we could also say:

3. It makes me angry to see you not trying your hardest.

Though I wonder whether the verb itself should carry the negative meaning:

4. It makes me angry to see you messing about.

MrP
Hello MrP

Could you tell me your opinion about the constructs of the type #1? To me, it sounds a bit weird as a sentence in a written document. I'm still inclined to believe "when" should be "that" in formal English. Am I wrong?

paco
Hello Paco

Oddly, there is a difference in meaning:

1. It makes me angry when you don't try your hardest.

On the specific occasions when he doesn't try his hardest, 'it' (i.e. the 'not trying') makes her angry.

2. It makes me angry that you don't try your hardest.

Generally, he doesn't try his hardest; and that's what makes her angry.

That said, if #2 were expanded, it could be made more specific:

3. It makes me angry that you don't try your hardest, when you go for an interview.

MrP
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