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Do not apply a personal pronoun to an animal unless its sex has been established or the animal has a name. Is this the rule? See examples below. Is every single example below correct?

* The dog was scared; it barked.
* Rover was scared; he barked.
* The cat, which was scared, ran to its basket.
* Susie the cat, who was scared, ran to her basket.
* The bull tosses his horns.

animal whose gender we know = he/him or she/her
animal with a name = who/whom
animal with no name = that/its

· Rosie is the cat WHO tore the living room
curtains.
· Can anyone tell me if a cat THAT has rabies can
cause harm to children? (not: WHO has rabies)
Unnamed cat/sex is unknown
· That was the tiger THAT ate my homework. (unknown sex/name)
· Tony the Tiger was the one WHO ate my homework.
· Fido and Dusty are the ones WHO ate my homework.

· Rosie was the cat WHO had rabies. (Instead of THAT had rabies because we know her gender and name.)
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Hi,

Do not apply a personal pronoun to an animal unless its sex has been established or the animal has a name. Is this the rule? See examples below. Is every single example below correct?

I agree with all these examples except as noted.

* The dog was scared; it barked.
* Rover was scared; he barked.
* The cat, which was scared, ran to its basket.
* Susie the cat, who was scared, ran to her basket.
* The bull tosses his horns. Its also seems OK to me.

animal whose gender we know = he/him or she/her I don't agree about this.

animal with a name = who/whom
animal with no name = that/its

· Rosie is the cat WHO tore the living room
curtains.

· Can anyone tell me if a cat THAT has rabies can
cause harm to children? (not: WHO has rabies)

Unnamed cat/sex is unknown

· That was the tiger THAT ate my homework. (unknown sex/name)

· Tony the Tiger was the one WHO ate my homework.

· Fido and Dusty are the ones WHO ate my homework.

· Rosie was the cat WHO had rabies. (Instead of THAT had rabies because we know her gender and name.)

Clive

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I would add that to me the it/he/she distinction seems more important than the that/who distinction. I would never refer to either of my cats as "it", but I could imagine saying "Charilie is the cat that sleeps on my bed" instead of "the cat who..."
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Comments  
khoffI would add that to me the it/he/she distinction seems more important than the that/who distinction. I would never refer to either of my cats as "it", but I could imagine saying "Charilie is the cat that sleeps on my bed" instead of "the cat who..."
When I talked about my dog or my cat, I always used 'she / who'. They were both my "kids" and I wouldn't use 'it / that' for either one of them.

I think it depends on the individual rather than on a grammatical distinction.
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Hi, how about this question? What's the correct answer?

I hate that dog _________ barks all night.
A why B what C whom D who

Thanks for the reply Emotion: smile
First, tell us your choice, please.